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By: Library Staff

WinnerThe NCSU Libraries is now accepting submissions for the 2016 Code+Art Student Visualization Contest. Graduate and undergraduate students, individually or in groups, who are interested in creative coding, generative art, animation, or data visualization are invited to create visualizations for any of the four large video walls at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, including the 20-foot wide Art Wall. Students graduating in December 2015 can submit entries and participate as members of competing teams, but are not eligible to win the cash prize.

Participants will compete for cash prizes of $1000, $500, and $250 to be awarded at the Code+Art reception held in April at the Hunt Library. All entries that are technologically viable and appropriate will be displayed on one of four video walls in Hunt Library and viewed by thousands of visitors every month.

Libraries have long been places where people have explored new ways of interacting with information. The video walls at the James B. Jr. Hunt Library were installed to create a dialogue with library visitors and show the work of students and faculty at the university. The NCSU Libraries developed this contest as a way for students to showcase visualizations created for this digital space. These visualizations will greet library visitors and give them a preview of the possibilities that await them inside the Hunt Library.

Judges are looking for attractive visualizations that are created with a computer. Submissions in these categories are strongly encouraged: data visualization / data art, generative art, procedurally generated environments (e.g. game environments), and animated GIFs. Submissions in these categories will also be considered: digital art, new media art, and animation/motion graphics.

Submit here:

Read about the 2015 winners here:

By: Library Staff

All NC State faculty teaching courses this Spring or in Fall 2016 are eligible to apply

(Raleigh, N.C.) – In Fall 2014, the NCSU Libraries, with support from the NC State University Foundation, awarded a first round of Alt-Textbook grants to faculty to adopt, adapt, or create free or low-cost alternatives to expensive textbooks. The first round is in progress and is expected to save NC State students more than $200,000 in the first year.

Textbook costs have outpaced inflation by 300% over the last 30 years. These runaway prices have become a major strain on students, with textbooks averaging $1,200 a year and 7 out of 10 students admitting on a recent Public Interest Research Group survey that they have not purchased a required text because of its cost.

The NCSU Libraries is committed to fostering change in the current textbook publishing environment. The Alt-Textbook Project will empower faculty to innovate pedagogically; enhance access for NC State students to high-quality, tailored educational materials; and reduce the financial burden of expensive textbooks.

Led by Will Cross, Director of the NCSU Libraries Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, a committee made up of librarians will be available to partner with faculty members on licensing resources, using digital repositories, and creating and publishing their own open educational resources.

Ranging between $500 and $2,000, the competitive Alt-Textbook grants will be awarded to help faculty pursue innovative uses of technology and information resources that can replace pricey traditional textbooks. Larger grants may be available for larger-scale or especially high-impact projects.

Grants are available to develop textbook alternatives for the Spring 2015 and Fall 2016 semesters. Possible approaches include:

  • creating a new open textbook or collection of materials
  • adopting an existing open textbook
  • assembling a collection of open resources into new course materials
  • licensing an e-textbook, video, or other media content for classroom use or e-reserves
  • using subscribed library resources

As faculty work on their proposals, NCSU librarians and staff are available to collaborate and share expertise in copyright, licensing, open access, course management software and tools, electronic reserves, subject-matter content, and multimedia resources.

The NCSU Libraries will hold several information sessions about the project. Faculty can learn more about the project, review the call for proposals, sign up for information sessions, and download grant applications at the Alt-Textbook Project website.

By: Library Staff

Dr. Jayant Baliga, an internationally recognized leader in electrical and computer engineering, has donated his papers to the North Carolina State University Libraries. Lauded by Scientific American as one of the heroes of the semiconductor revolution, Baliga received this year’s Global Energy Prize.

In addition to being a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, Dr. Baliga is the director of NC State’s Power Semiconductor Research Center. Among his many accomplishments, he is perhaps best known for his invention of a power semiconductor device, the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT), often used as an electronic switch in modern appliances, from electric cars to air conditioners to portable defibrillators. The IGBT, as he describes it, has had “a major impact on creating a sustainable world-wide society with improved living standards while mitigating the environmental impact.”

According to Dr. Louis A. Martin-Vega, Dean of Engineering at NC State, Dr. Baliga’s “groundbreaking scholarship and leadership have been instrumental in addressing major global societal challenges and helping the College of Engineering and NC State become a research powerhouse. Throughout his career, Jay has generously shared his expertise with our students and faculty so I am not surprised and very pleased that he has chosen to share his life’s work with future students and faculty through the NCSU Libraries.”

Baliga has received numerous awards during his distinguished career, some of which include the 2014 IEEE Medal of Honor, the 2011 National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama, the 2012 North Carolina Award for Science, the 1999 IEEE Lamme Medal, the 1998 IEEE Ebers Award, the 1998 O. Max Gardner Award, the 1993 IEEE Liebman Award, the 1992 Pride of India Award (First Recipient), and the 2011 Alexander Quarles Holladay Medal for Excellence.

He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Electronic Design Engineering Hall of Fame, the Rensselaer Alumni Hall of Fame, the European Academy of Sciences, and he is an IEEE Life Fellow. Baliga has authored or edited 19 books and over 500 scientific articles and has been granted 120 U.S. Patents.

Baliga received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (1974) and his M.S. in Electrical Engineering (1971) from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. He spent fifteen years at the General Electric Research and Development Center, leading their power device studies. There, he received the highest scientific rank of Coolidge Fellow. Baliga joined NCSU in 1988 as a Full Professor and was promoted in 1997 as Distinguished University Professor.

His papers will be housed in the Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries and include records from the Power Semiconductor Research Center—meeting documents, vendor information, software agreements, technical working group meeting reports, and related administrative files. Also included in his Papers are Electric Power Research Institute patent applications and other like materials.

The SCRC holds research and primary resources in areas that reflect and support the teaching and research needs of the students, faculty, and researchers at the university. By emphasizing established and emerging areas of excellence at NC State University and corresponding strengths within the Libraries’ overall collection, the SCRC develops collections strategically in order to support NC State’s growth as a world-class academic institution.

By: Library Staff

The Tenth Annual NC State University Graduate Student Research Symposium was held on March 25, 2015 at the McKimmon Center. The Symposium showcases the exceptional and diverse graduate-level research going on at NC State. Graduate Program directors nominated standout master’s and doctoral graduate student researchers for an opportunity to showcase their research and practice and enhance their communication skills. Student posters were judged by faculty in the represented academic areas.

In collaboration with the University Graduate Student Association, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place posters in eight categories (Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, Design, Education, Engineering, Humanities, Life Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences and Management) will be exhibited in the Hunt Library iPearl Immersion Theater, starting September 7. The exhibit will run through September 13.

For more information about the NC State University Graduate Student Research Symposium or the University Graduate Student Association, please visit their websites:


By: Library Staff

Deal gives NC State researchers ability to mine robust collections of digital primary source archives

(Raleigh, N.C.) -  By signing another pioneering content mining agreement—this time with Adam Matthew, a SAGE company—the NCSU Libraries has established itself as a leader in the research library world when it comes to licensing blanket access to commercially-vended historical collections.

This comes not long after their unprecedented data mining deals with Gale and Unlimited Priorities.

By agreeing to provide NC State researchers electronic access to ‘Mass Observation Online,’ sourced from the University of Sussex, England, and the ability to mine archival data on university servers, Adam Matthew Digital joins Gale as a leading-edge example for commercial vendors.

Darby Orcutt, Assistant Head of Collection Management for the NCSU Libraries, developed this library-vendor content mining model and considers it mutually beneficial: “Adam Matthew has added another facet of value and attractiveness to their products for researchers, while researchers have gained a valuable corpus that was previously unavailable for robust computational exploration.”

By: Chris Tonelli

3D Design Workshops with Autodesk Fusion 360
Monday, August 24, 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Hunt Library Teaching & Visualization Lab

Tuesday, August 25, 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
D. H. Hill Library Makerspace

Amazing Alumni – Chris Padgett ‘11

Wednesday, August 26 at 3:00 p.m.
D. H. Hill Library, East Wing, Multimedia Seminar Center

In celebration of the new D. H. Hill Library Makerspace, join us for this special guest during Maker Days. Chris Padgett is the founder and CEO of Fusion3, a company that manufactures high-performance 3D printers. After graduating from NC State with a BS in MechanicalEngineering in 2011, Padgett resigned from his paying job in early 2013 to found Fusion3, using his prior experience with product design, management and support and supply chain development. Padgett will discuss his experiences with founding and running a company, working with family, and what he sees as the future of 3D printing. After the program, join us in the new Makerspace for an open house with giveaways and demos.

D. H. Hill Makerspace Open House

Wednesday, August 26 & Thursday, August 27, 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Wondering what happens in our makerspace? Curious about the tools we have? Want to try your hand at making something? Come to our Maker Days Open House! Join us for some hand-on activities and learn more about electronics, 3D priting and scanning, and much more!

Making Sense of Sensor Data: An Introduction to the Internet of Things

Thursday, August 27 at 9:00 a.m. D. H. Hill Library Makerspace

In this introductory workshop you’ll learn how build and manage a “thing” in the “Internet of Things.” Eliot Inman, a Manager of Software Development at SAS, will teach you how build an analog sensor using an Arduino, gather data from that sensor, and analyze thosedata using SAS. Participation in this hands-on workshop requires absolutely zero experience in electronics, software development or statistics. We will start at the start.

The Impact of Maker Culture on the Economy and the Classroom

Thursday, August 27 at 3:00 p.m.
D. H. Hill Library, West Wing Auditorium

In celebration of the new D. H. Hill Library Makerspace, join us to learn how the concept and practice of “making” is creating a new paradigm for entrepreneurs, educators, and students. Aly Khalifa, NC State alumnus and co-founder of Designbox, Dr. David Rieder, associate professor at NC State and co-founder of CIRCUIT Studio, and Victoria Rind, an NC State student in textile engineering, will share their experiences and discuss how the maker movement is impacting business, culture, and academia. After the program, join us in the new Makerspace for an open house with giveaways and demos.

Aug 07 2015


By: Chris Tonelli

Aug 05 2015

Coffee & Viz

By: Marian Fragola

Held in one of the NCSU Libraries high-tech spaces, Coffee & Viz is a forum in which NC State researchers share their visualization work and discuss topics of interest. All Coffee & Viz programs are free and open to the public and are presented by the NCSU Libraries. Coffee and light refreshments will be served at 9:15 a.m., program begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, contact Karen Ciccone at 919-515-3513 or


Dr. Julie Mell (History) and Dr. Helen Burgess (English)

Friday, August 21 at 9:30 a.m.

D.H. Hill Library, Visualization Studio

Dr. Julie Mell and Dr. Helen Burgess will discuss how they have integrated visualization and the Libraries’ high-tech spaces into their teaching practice and how using visualization can help students learn in new ways. This session will be presented twice: at 9:30 a.m. and again at 10:00 a.m. Limited space available, please register at:

Dr. Ben Watson (Computer Science)

Friday, September 18 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Duke Energy Hall

Thanks to technology, visual communication is easier than ever to create and disseminate. Unfortunately, technology hasn’t yet been able to help people communicate effectively — thus the catchphrase “Death by Powerpoint.” Dr. Ben Watson, associate professor of computer science at NC State, will discuss “visualization as persuasion,” using visualization as a tool for communication rather than discovery.

Dr. Jennifer Landin (Biological Sciences)

Friday, October 23 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching and Visualization Lab

Dr. Jennifer Landin, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at NC State, is a biologist, illustrator and science educator. She will discuss biological illustration as a form of visualization and the challenges in teaching students to observe, investigate, create and share.

Dr. Matthew Booker (History)

Friday, November 20 at 9:30 a.m.

Hunt Library, Creativity Studio

Dr. Matthew Booker, associate professor of history at NC State, will address the question, “What use is spatial visualization to historians?” With Dr. Michael Young in Computer Science, Dr. Booker coordinates the Visual Narrative cluster in the Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program.

Interactive graphic depicting Establishment of South San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds and Refuges, 1857 to 2004


Dr. Helena Mitasova, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, January 23 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Helena Mitasova is a professor in Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a faculty fellow at the Center for Geospatial Analytics. She is a charter member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and a member of Open Source GRASS GIS project steering committee. She will talk about visualizing large geospatial data sets and modeling of dynamic landscape processes.

The presentation will also include examples of open source GRASS GIS visualizations developed by students for their course projects using the Teaching and Visualization Lab and Tangeoms: Tangible geospatial modeling system.

Dr. Christopher Healey, Computer Science: Understanding Color for Data Visualization

Friday, February 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Chris Healey’s work harnesses visual perception to create visualization techniques supporting the rapid and effective exploration and analysis of large, complex datasets.

“Colour is a familiar concept that we all recognize and use in our day-to-day lives. Understanding how colour ‘works’ is a much more fascinating problem, however, involving the physics of light, visual perception, language and culture, and context. This talk will touch on these issues by discussing them and demonstrating how they affect presenting data with colour. As a practical example, I will show how we used colour to visualize results from the recent 2014 U.S. elections.”

Dr. Gary Lackmann, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Friday, March 20 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

Dr. Gary Lackmann is an atmospheric scientist at NC State who studies high-impact weather, climate change, and numerical atmospheric modeling. He will present visualizations that clarify the structure and workings of hurricanes, using Hurricane Katrina as an example.

Professor David Hill, Architecture

Friday, April 17 at 9:15 a.m.

Hunt Library, Teaching & Visualization Lab

The Great Fire of London destroyed St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1666. Nearly four centuries later, Professors John N. Wall (English) and David Hill (Architecture) have rebuilt it—in virtual space. Wall, a John Donne scholar, wanted to hear the famed poet and dean of the cathedral deliver one of his most famous sermons in order to experience the event “unfolding in real time in the context of an interactive and collaborative occasion.”

The Virtual Paul’s Cross Project (VPCP) uses architectural modeling software and digital acoustic simulations to recreate the visual, spatial, and auditory experience of Donne’s Gunpowder Day sermon delivered on November 5th, 1622. At this Coffee & Viz lecture, Prof. Hill will present the research and modeling process that created the virtual environment of London’s pre-fire St. Paul’s Cathedral.  He will discuss how digital tools can simulate momentous events in spaces that have not existed for hundreds of years.

By: Library Staff

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, July 30 & July 31.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

By: Chris Tonelli

Stock images of HuntThe NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference, which will be held at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh, NC on September 20-22, 2015. The University of Calgary and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) are co-sponsors of this event.

Librarians, architects, planners, designers, information technologists, and others will gather to discuss the challenges and achievements of designing libraries and learning centers for the 21st century. Sessions will feature an array of topics including creating and communicating a vision; developing innovative, technology-rich learning and research spaces; creating Makerspaces; planning staff workspaces; and addressing organizational and service models, including transforming the collaborative roles of librarians in these new research and discovery environments. We will include examples from renovated libraries as well as new buildings. In-depth tours of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the D. H. Hill Library will be offered.

An optional preconference will be held on September 20, 2015. The theme of the preconference is “21st Century Libraries: Why Do They Matter?” and it will include sessions on infrastructure, spaces, partnerships, and re-education of librarians to support the life cycle of research and teaching.

For more information, please visit the conference website at