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By: David Hiscoe

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, December 4-16.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

At the D. H. Hill Library

  • Tours and events will be limited around final exams, December 4-16
  • The Wolfpack One Card will continue to be required for access after 10:00 pm.

By: Library Staff

At 17, Dr. Ricky Bloomfield (’04) had pretty definite plans to attend a prestigious local private university. NC State only made it on his list as “backup school.” Until he visited.

The Park Scholarship he was offered was a significant draw, but it was really the sense of excitement and what he calls “the immersion in innovation” that he experienced on his brief trip to campus that set the direction for the rest of his life.

The Bloomfield family, Ricky and Kim, with daughters Catherine and Miriam.

The Bloomfield family, Ricky and Kim,
with daughters Catherine and Miriam.

Just listing Ricky’s undergraduate majors and minors gives you some sense of what he cherished at NC State. There are four—Chemistry, Secondary Education, Saxophone Performance, and Spanish. He’s not one to be put in a box.

That ability to range wide and deep across disciplines led quickly not only to a medical degree, but to the successful iOS apps company he began while still in medical school. Soon he was engrossed in figuring out new ways that mobile applications could help transform the medical field, letting him, as he explains, “combine my passion taking care of patients one at a time with helping out patients millions at a time with medical technology.” Dr. Bloomfield is currently Director, Mobile Technology Strategy for Duke Health Technology Solutions, as well as Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Duke University.

Ricky’s wife, Kim Bloomfield (‘02 in Chemistry and Textile Chemistry), first learned about the Hunt Library on a tour while she was president of the Park Scholars Alumni Society, back when the building was still under construction. “I got excited about it,” she says with some understatement, given the couple’s ongoing passionate support of the new space. “Knowing how much Ricky loves technology and how much I loved studying up in the stacks at D. H. Hill, it was something we became interested in supporting.”

“We are highly into education—and we have kids and want them to be excited about learning. It was a way that I could see getting my own children excited about NC State. And I was sure that the new iconic library would be a benefit to recruiting for the Park Scholarships.” Their two daughters, Ricky explains, will no doubt be NC State, Class of 2028.

“When the Hunt Library was announced, packed full of technology—which is no surprise given NC State’s talents, areas of focus, and research—it really intrigued me,” Ricky continues. “We found out more about it and felt it was something we wanted to get behind.” Right after the building opened, they decided to sponsor and name a student workstation on the building’s 4th floor.

Ricky explains their motivation: “we both went through the Park Scholars program, feel very fortunate in what we were given, and feel an obligation to give back to an institution that has given us so much. We want to see NC State continue to succeed, and the Hunt Library will serve as a rallying point for showcasing talent and innovation. For recruiting, there’s nothing better than taking prospective students to Hunt to show them what NC State can do and hint at the things that they themselves will do once they are here in proximity to all this innovation and technology. Giving back to something that will only make NC State stronger is a no-brainer.”

Their message to young graduates is especially clear. Laughing that they are probably “skewing the age profile of NC State donors down a little,” Kim explains that “we subscribe to the idea that what you spend your money on shows what you believe in. When we began giving to NC State, it wasn’t large amounts—Ricky was still in med school. Recent graduates are sometimes intimidated by hearing about endowed faculty positions or big gifts. But smaller donations made regularly can make a big difference, and they’re more feasible for younger alumni. Our own gifts are not huge, and they did stretch our budget to begin with. But we realized that we can make a huge difference even if we can’t yet endow a chair or name a wing in the library. If recent graduates start from a younger age, this can really make a difference for decades before they enter their golden years.”

As for their investment in the Hunt Library, both have been back many times since the space opened and both are happy, according to Ricky, that it is “living up to its promise as a space where you can let your creativity flow and combine the technologies in ways that are novel and interesting.”

Like their own lives, “things are just getting started. The best is most certainly yet to come.”

By: admin

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)?

NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty.

READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481.

Upcoming programs:

Read Smart Book Discussion – Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou

Thursday, November 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Dr. Dorianne Laux, poet and professor of English at NC State, will moderate a discussion of Maya Angelou’s Mom & Me & Mom. In this New York Times bestselling memoir, Angelou portrays the triumphs and struggles of being the daughter of Vivian Baxter, a larger-than-life force in her Angelou’s life.

Read Smart Book Discussion – Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant by Roz Chast

Thursday, December 11 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Dr. Karen Bullock, associate professor and head of the Department of Social Work at NC State will discuss Chast’s illustrated chronicle of coping with her aging parents. Chast, a cartoonist for The New Yorker, is a finalist for the the National Book Award.

Read Smart Book Discussion – Factory Man: how one furniture maker battled offshoring, stayed local–and helped save an American town by Beth Macy Thursday, January 15 at 7:00 p.m.

Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Ave., Raleigh

Steven Walker, assistant director of NC State’s Furniture Manufacturing and Management Center will lead a discussion of Factory Man by Beth Macy. The New York Times says, “Macy’s passion and enthusiasm are palpable on every page.”

By: Library Staff

As part of our mandate to preserve the history of North Carolina State University and distribute that history widely to scholars, alumni, and the public, the NCSU Libraries has made the first 70 years of the Technician, the university’s student newspaper, available online in a format that is easy to browse and search.

Technician prints

Since it began publishing on February 2, 1920, the Technician has been the school’s most powerful way for students to tell their own stories, to give their perspective on the issues of the times, to influence the direction of the university and the community, and—quite often—to tweak the nose of authority.

The 4000 issues from 1920 through 1990 that are digitized and indexed in the NCSU Libraries’ online collection open a valuable window for historians, social scientists, and others who study the history of NC State and the attitudes and accomplishments of this important slice of our population. They will also be a delight for NC State graduates, staff, and faculty who can now go online and relive their own times at the university—silly fashions, fads, serious issues, and all.

Visitors to vintage Technician issues can, for instance, explore a 1920 sketch of the proposed Bell Tower, enjoy a story on the doubling of the bleacher capacity in October 1921—“that glorious day in football history when N. C. State College will match her strength and skill against the aggregation from the University” at Chapel Hill—or see how the NC State community reacted to the 1970 killings at Kent State University as the Vietnam war divided a campus proud of its long-standing tradition of patriotism and support for the military.

Visits to the campus by John F. Kennedy (1960) and Ronald Reagan (1985) show the range of political interests and views on campus over time, and the yearly April Fools issues establish an enduring heritage of enthusiastic, irreverent, and impolitic student satire and humor.

The online issues of the Technician join a range of other online resources on NC State University history that are available through the NCSU Libraries’ Historical State, Rare & Unique Digital Collections, and Student Leadership websites.

Future plans call for adding issues from the years after 1990 to the Technician collection. To learn how to support this initiative or others from the NCSU Libraries, please visit www.lib.ncsu.edu/giving.

By: David Hiscoe

Calling it “a smart library for the 21st century,” the Hunt Library was cited as a key factor in the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ choice to honor NC State’s Centennial Campus with its second annual Innovation and Economic Prosperity University award as one of the nation’s most innovative and productive economic engines.

By: Library Staff

On November 3, the NCSU Libraries will open a major exhibit that tells the stories of how students are transformed into leaders at North Carolina State University.  In conjuction with the exhibit, on November 6 the Libraries will also host a panel discussion during NC State’s Homecoming week that will feature five past student body presidents, including the first female who held this position; a former mayor of Raleigh; and the current senior class president.

Leading the Pack: Student Leaders at NC State explores a rich cultural tradition that encourages students to act on what they are learning.  This alchemy of participation and involvement has produced an unusually large number of citizens who began their lives of service to the university and to the wider community while students at NC State.

When Abraham Lincoln signed the legislation that created land-grant institutions like NC State, he not only created a practical way to make higher education available to motivated, ambitious people who did not have access to the elite private schools of the time; his bold but practical move also provided a perfect model for how real leaders should think deeply about the problems in front of them and then act to solve them.

Transformative leadership was present at NC State’s land grant founding.  And ever since, NC State students have been picking up the tools they discovered on campus and setting out to change the world.  Immersed while on campus in an ethic that asks them to do nothing less than solve global challenges, each generation has left to shape the future in fields as diverse as engineering, public policy, agriculture, defense, design, humanitarian work, medicine, journalism, and business.

Leading the Pack examines that culture of leadership at NC State and follows the stories of those who immersed themselves in student government, student media, ROTC, Greek life, and service projects—or just followed their own geniuses—and learned the skills that later let them serve as the state’s youngest and most re-elected governor, or lead the nation’s military, or establish a non-profit that battles the water-borne illnesses that kill a child every 21 seconds.

Leading the Pack draws on the rich trove of materials collected by the NCSU Libraries’ Student Leadership Initiative.  This ongoing, multi-year program has chronicled the experiences and impact of former student leaders through the collection of hundreds of video oral histories, biographical essays, and digitized images.

During the week of NC State’s Homecoming, the NCSU Libraries will also host a panel discussion of current and past student leaders to explore how NC State fosters leadership and challenges students to make positive change.  The panel will be moderated by Tony Caravano, Student Body President from 2003 to 2005, and will include:

  • Superior Court Judge Ron Spivey, Student Body President, 1981-1982
  • Kelly Hook, Student Body President, 2010-2011
  • Kate Sterling, the first female Student Body President, 1970-1971
  • Smedes York, former NC State basketball player and former mayor of Raleigh
  • Harold Pettigrew, Student Body President, 2000-2001
  • Molly Basdeo, current Senior Class President

The panel discussion will be held on November 6 at 4 p. m. in the Mountains Ballroom at the Talley Student Center.

Both the exhibit and the panel discussion are open and free to the public.  The exhibit may be visited during regular library hours in the D. H. Hill Library’s Exhibit Gallery through the spring of 2015.

By: Library Staff

Help shape the future of the NCSU Libraries by attending the next Student Advisory Board meeting. All students are welcome. The meeting will take place Tuesday (10/14/14) from 5:30 pm – 7 pm. The meeting will take place in the Assembly Room (#2130, above the Learning Commons) at D. H. Hill Library. Dinner from Chipotle will be provided courtesy of the Friends of the Library.

By: Library Staff

Mid-twentieth century modernist architect G. Milton Small, Jr. of Raleigh; Victorian era Charlotte house designer Harriet Morrison Irwin; German-born carpenter John Deitrick Tavis in antebellum Germanton; Civil War era joiner and A.M.E. minister George A. Rue of New Bern—these are just a few of the two dozen architects and builders whose new biographies have been added recently to North Carolina Architects & Builders: A Biographical Dictionary.

G. Milton Small, Jr., Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company, Raleigh, Joseph Molitor Collection, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

With these new postings, the popular North Carolina State University Libraries website passes a major benchmark, now presenting more than 300 biographies of architects and builders who worked in North Carolina and accompanying data on more than 3,000 buildings they created in the state.

Launched in 2009 with 170 entries, the biographical dictionary project had its roots in the late 1970s in research for the book, Architects and Builders in North Carolina: A History of the Practice of Building (University of North Carolina Press, 1990), by Catherine W. Bishir, Charlotte V. Brown, Carl R. Lounsbury, and Ernest H. Wood III. The biographical dictionary was originally conceived as a companion print publication, but in 2007 the concept shifted to a web-based, “born digital,” resource that can be easily searched and constantly expanded.

The free, user-friendly ncarchitects.lib.ncsu.edu contains essential information about the lives and works of the people who created the state’s architecture from the colonial period to the late 20th century. Content developer and architectural historian Catherine W. Bishir says, “We believe it’s important to include not just the great architects of landmarks like Biltmore and the Dorton Arena, but also lesser-known artisans and builders, black and white, enslaved and free, who actually built most of our architectural legacy.”

A frequent user of the site, Andre’ D Vann, coordinator of the University Archives and Instructor of Public History at North Carolina Central University, reports that in his research on historic houses in Durham, “I have found the North Carolina Architects & Builders website essential in uncovering the rich and unique stories behind many historical buildings and builders.” In particular it has “shed light on African American architects and designers like Gaston Edwards who braved a new world and created a body of work worthy of emulation.”

Frank Harmon, Raleigh architect and professor at NC State’s College of Design, sees North Carolina Architects & Builders as “exceptionally useful to our students and to scholars in North Carolina and beyond” because it offers “insight into the lives of the men and women who have shaped the built environment of our state, a lineage that continues to inspire us today.” Few states have achieved such a comprehensive biographical dictionary, says Harmon, and “none has a better website of architects and builders.”

The site has won prizes from the Preservation North Carolina and the Vernacular Architecture Forum for its innovative and inclusive approach. Multiple authors have contributed to the biographies and accompanying building lists.  New entries are in progress, and as project manager Markus Wust comments, “The website itself attracts new information from users who help make it more complete. There’s always more to learn.”

Sep 19 2014

Image Discovery Week

By: Library Staff

September 22nd-26th, the Design Library and the Special Collections Research Center will host Image Discovery Week to highlight all of the image collections available through the library. Follow our blog blitz each day to learn about a wide variety of image-related resources.

By: David Hiscoe

The NCSU Libraries has been awarded a grant to tackle a significant emerging opportunity for academic libraries and the historians, social scientists, and other researchers that they support:  how best to capture and save the increasingly critical but ephemeral social media conversations that now regularly document our lives and times.

The EZ Innovation Grant from the State Library of North Carolina will enable librarians Jason Casden and Brian Dietz to lead a team to develop a freely available web toolkit to help guide institutions that preserve our cultural heritage by collecting and curating the primary documents that are the raw materials of history. Increasingly these materials are created and shared on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media platforms.  But since few institutions are systematically saving these conversations, much of our current history’s raw material is quickly and irrevocably disappearing as quickly as it is produced.  And while tools to save these materials are becoming more sophisticated and less expensive, very little has been done to help libraries and others deploy them in thoughtful, effective ways.

The NCSU Libraries has previously taken a lead role in this area with its award-winning Lentil platform, an open-source tool that harvests and makes it easy to present collections of social media images from the Instagram platform.  The new grant would build on this work by exploring methods and best practices for integrating social media into existing ways that libraries collect primary materials.  The team will start by investigating social media associated with campus events, spaces, student groups, and campus units at NC State—and will develop software, procedures, and documentation to cost-effectively implement social media archiving at the NCSU Libraries.

This work will then allow the team to develop a web toolkit to help other institutions:

●      Collect official communication of various organizational groups

●      Collect unofficial, crowdsourced communication from communities of interest

●      Develop techniques for enriching collections at a minimal cost by taking advantage of harvesting interfaces provided by social media platforms

The toolkit will also include materials to help other cultural heritage institutions design and document criteria for what they collect and strategies to begin collecting social media. These materials will include a scan of work being done in the area, a risk assessment for potential legal concerns, and a discussion of the impact of social media on archival research.

The social media toolkit is planned for release in Summer 2015.

Jason Casden is the Lead Librarian for the Digital Services Development group at the NCSU Libraries, where he helps to develop and implement scalable digital library applications. Casden was named a Library Journal “Mover & Shaker” in 2011, a designation for young leaders who show promise for fundamentally changing how we gather and share information.

Brian Dietz is the Digital Program Librarian for Special Collections at NCSU Libraries. Dietz has served as principal investigator on several LSTA-funded projects. He recently moderated “Getting Things Done with Born Digital,” a session at the Society of American Archivists’ 2014 annual conference.

The EZ Innovation grants are made possible through funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.