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By: Library Staff

NC State students rely on the Libraries for quiet study space, particularly during final exams. To help ensure that we can meet this need, the NCSU Libraries is continuing changes put in place this summer to reduce disruptions during the critical times around finals.

At the Hunt Library

  • Access during reading days and finals will be limited to NC State students, faculty, and staff, who will need to use their Wolfpack One Cards to enter the Hunt Library security gates, July 30 & July 31.
  • No tours, sightseeing, or events will be allowed between the last day of classes and the completion of final exams.

By: Chris Tonelli

Stock images of HuntThe NCSU Libraries is pleased to announce that registration is now open for the Fourth Annual Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference, which will be held at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library in Raleigh, NC on September 20-22, 2015. The University of Calgary and the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) are co-sponsors of this event.

Librarians, architects, planners, designers, information technologists, and others will gather to discuss the challenges and achievements of designing libraries and learning centers for the 21st century. Sessions will feature an array of topics including creating and communicating a vision; developing innovative, technology-rich learning and research spaces; creating Makerspaces; planning staff workspaces; and addressing organizational and service models, including transforming the collaborative roles of librarians in these new research and discovery environments. We will include examples from renovated libraries as well as new buildings. In-depth tours of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the D. H. Hill Library will be offered.

An optional preconference will be held on September 20, 2015. The theme of the preconference is “21st Century Libraries: Why Do They Matter?” and it will include sessions on infrastructure, spaces, partnerships, and re-education of librarians to support the life cycle of research and teaching.

For more information, please visit the conference website at go.ncsu.edu/designinglibraries.

Logos

By: Chris Tonelli

Because the College of Design played such a critical role in his early development as an architect, Phil Freelon has chosen the NCSU Libraries as the home for his architectural archive: “I am proud to be a member of the NC State family,” Freelon noted, “and it is an honor to be recognized in this way.” Freelon has donated  his architectural records from his earliest years as a practitioner and plans to add to his archive in the future.

In addition to being a student in the College of Design in the 70’s, Freelon has taught at the College, served on its Design Guild/Design Life Board, the Board of Visitors, and the Board of Trustees. He has designed several buildings on campus, including the Partners III Lab Building on Centennial Campus and the new Gregg Museum addition, currently under construction.

Freelon is the founder and President of The Freelon Group, Inc.  His work has been published in national professional journals including Architecture, Progressive Architecture, Architectural Record, and Contract Magazine, where he was named Designer of the Year for 2008.

Metropolis and Metropolitan Home magazines and the New York Times have also featured Freelon and his firm.  His furniture design has been recognized nationally,  including first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition and design contract work with Herman Miller.

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Freelon earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree in Architecture from North Carolina State University and his Master of Architecture degree from MIT.  He then received a Loeb Fellowship and spent a year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.  Freelon went on to serve as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina State University’s College of Design and has been a visiting critic/lecturer at Harvard, MIT, the University of Maryland, Syracuse University, Auburn University, the University of Utah, the California College of the Arts, Kent State University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, among others.  He is currently on the faculty at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning.

Freelon is a Peer Professional for the GSA’s Design Excellence Program and has served on numerous design award juries, including the National AIA Institute Honor Awards jury and the National Endowment for the Arts Design Stewardship Panel. He is also a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED Accredited Professional, and the 2009 recipient of the AIA Thomas Jefferson Award for Public Architecture.

Appointed in 2011 by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, Freelon is part of the team leading the design for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture and is a preeminent architectural designer of museums featuring African-American history, including the Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta and the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco.

By: Mike Nutt

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

Students working on the Black Mountain College farm

The farm at Black Mountain College was a remarkable achievement. Student-initiated and largely student-led, the farm was conceived in fall 1933, debated throughout winter, and launched in spring 1934. Building on his well-received program at the Hunt Library last summer, David Silver, visiting scholar at the NCSU Libraries, is back to discuss the origins of the farm at Black Mountain College and share his recent research that dispels some often-held misconceptions about both the farm and the College itself.

Using the Hunt Library’s high resolution visualization spaces as well as materials from the NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, Silver will bring never-before-seen photographs and his electric presentation style to this interactive discussion of the genesis of the most significant art college in America’s history. Silver is an associate professor of media studies, environmental studies, and urban agriculture at the University of San Francisco.

There will be two presentations on Tuesday June 30, 2015: one at 10:30am and one at 7pm. Both presentations begin on the Commons Wall stairs between levels 3 and 4. Following the program, attendees are invited to join Professor Silver for refreshments and discussion in the Hunt Library’s Collaboration Hub (Level 5).

Free and open to the public. Presented by the NCSU Libraries. For more information contact Mike Nutt at mrnutt@ncsu.edu. For information about directions and parking, visit lib.ncsu.edu/parking.

By: Chris Tonelli

Makerspace Photo One

As part of President Obama’s National Week of Making, the NCSU Libraries is opening their Makerspace in D. H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

The Makerspace will offer a hands-on, do-it-yourself space where users are encouraged to experiment and learn new hardware and software skills. It will be equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, electronics prototyping tools, sewing machines, and general tools for making, and will be accessible to all NC State students, faculty, and staff.

While typically available for open use, faculty integrating maker tools into their curriculum will be able to reserve the Makerspace for classes, and the Libraries will use the space to hold workshops featuring particular tools and techniques.

The Libraries hopes the D. H. Hill Makerspace will serve as a hub for making on campus—a place to expose the NC State community to making and its corresponding emerging literacies. To compliment their expertise with maker tools and techniques, the NCSU Libraries staff has expertise in disciplinary research, industry and market research, patent searching and filing, digital product development, data management, all of which can enrich a maker’s approach. The Libraries is committed to bringing critical thinking to the maker experience and technology literacy.

With the D. H. Hill Makerspace, the Libraries have added yet another innovative learning space and equipped it with an extensive set of maker technologies: MakerBot and LulzBot 3D printers; Arduino, Galileo, and Raspberry Pi electronics prototyping platforms; Bernina sewing machines; an Epilog laser cutter, and an electronics workstation with Hakko soldering iron. The space also offers a “tinkering table” for drop-in users, featuring hands-on making tools like LittleBits, 3Doodlers, LEGOS, and MaKey MaKeys. These interactive experiences will help stir users’ creative thinking and get them making on their first visit.

By: Chris Tonelli

NCSU Libraries’ own Adam Rogers and Dan Hawkins are traveling to Washington, D.C. today to participate in the first Capitol Hill Maker Faire, which is being held at the Rayburn House Office Building. The Faire is open to the public, members of Congress, and congressional staff. Rogers and Hawkins are scheduled to meet with Congressman David Price of North Carolina later today.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire kicks off a nationwide celebration of making, and is being held in conjunction with the much larger National Maker Faire at the University of DC, on June 12–13. It will be followed by the White House National Week of Making, June 12–18. As part of the National Week of Making, NCSU Libraries will be opening their own Makerspace in D.H. Hill Library on Tuesday, June 16.

Hosted by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in collaboration with the Congressional Maker Caucus, Maker Media, and Nation of Makers, the faire will explore the new movement driven by hobbyists, tinkerers, crafters, and innovators that is breathing new life and innovation into American manufacturing. The movement is also changing the face of informal learning at community institutions with learning that is inherently experimental, inventive, creative, and project-based.

The Capitol Hill Maker Faire is free and open to the public. It runs from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm and will feature approximately 30 exhibitors with hands-on displays, such as robots, crafts, 3D printers, and other new manufacturing tools. The faire will be preceded by a series of panel discussions, from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, with leaders of the Maker movement discussing its impact on the economy, education, and community development.

For details, go to www.imls.gov/maker.

By: Chris Tonelli

Life’s Little Dramas presents objects that were purpose-built to be used as puppets and only hints at a phenomenon that is as vast and varied as humanity itself. Puppetry has emerged in every inhabited part of the globe as one in the repertoire of activities that have made us human since the dawn of time. —Roger Manley, Director & Chief Curator of the Gregg Museum of Art & Design

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to host Life’s Little Dramas: Puppets, Proxies, and Spirits, an exhibit conceived and curated by NC State’s Gregg Museum of Art & Design. Culled from a recent gift from John C. Henry, along with key works on loan, the exhibit hosts a complete Edwardian-era ”Punch and Judy” troupe, Indonesian wayang kulit shadow puppets, and marionettes from India, Shri Lanka, the Czech Republic, and the earliest days of broadcast television, including America’s first TV “star”—any guesses?

For more information visit the Gregg Museum’s web site http://www.ncsu.edu/gregg/exhibitions.html.

The gallery is open during normal library hours: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/hours/hill/general.

By: Chris Tonelli

The NCSU Libraries has been awarded a $98,997 grant to support the digitization project “Better Living in North Carolina: Bringing Science and Technology to the People,” a collaboration with North Carolina A&T State University’s F. D. Bluford Library. The project serves students, faculty, researchers, and the general public by digitizing and making easily available online an important body of primary agricultural extension documents that reveal the scientific and technological transformation of North Carolina’s agricultural economy during the twentieth century and the ways this transformation improved the lives of its citizens.

The funds to support this work were awarded by the State Library of North Carolina and are made possible through funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) as administered by the State Library of North Carolina–a division of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. These federal funds are investments that help libraries deliver relevant and up-to-date services for their communities.

The materials digitized through “Better Living in North Carolina” document the advances of modern agricultural practices and their economic impact across the state. During the time period covered by the project, farming in North Carolina moved from subsistence levels to the production of global commodities–a shift driven in part by research and development done at NC State University. Throughout the twentieth century, as this shift occurred, Cooperative Extension programs–based at NC State and NCA&TSU–helped North Carolina farmers and agricultural businesses learn and apply new research in the agricultural and life sciences. Specific programs run by Cooperative Extension during this time have included 4-H, Family and Consumer Sciences (originally called Home Demonstration and Home Economics), various farm animal programs (such as poultry extension, swine extension, etc.), boll weevil eradication, soil conservation, rural electrification, plant disease clinics, rural development, and food and nutrition education. During the world wars, there was an emphasis on food production and preservation.

During the first year of the project, the NCSU Libraries will digitize up to 252,000 pages of Cooperative Extension annual reports from 1909 to 1983. North Carolina A&T State University F. D. Bluford Library will scan up to 5,000 pages of correspondence, pamphlets, andscrapbooks, as well as photographs, from collections of two prominent African American extension agents.

“Better Living in North Carolina” builds upon the success of other digital projects developed by the NCSU Libraries with the support of LSTA funds.  Most recently, the Libraries completed “Cultivating a Revolution: Science, Technology, and Change in North Carolina Agriculture, 1950-1979” http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/specialcollections/projects/cultivating-a-revolution.html). The project digitized 41,299 pages of archival documents, 2,741 photographs, and 161 videos and films. Previous agricultural digitization projects include the NCSU Libraries’ Green ‘N’ Growing (http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/specialcollections/greenngrowing/), which documents the history of 4-H and home demonstration in North Carolina from the 1900s to the 1970s.

The LSTA grant program administered by the State Library of North Carolina funds projects that help libraries deliver learning opportunities for a lifetime, support libraries in their mission to provide cost-effective access to the Internet and to information expertise, and make library resources more accessible to all users.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas.

The North Carolina State Library has posted a list of all LSTA grant awards for 2015-2016. For additional information about “Better Living in North Carolina,” contact Brian Dietz, Digital Program Librarian for Special Collections, at brian_dietz@ncsu.edu.

May 22 2015

Apple Watch Wrap-up

By: Chris Tonelli

So, in the last few days with the watch, I discovered that the Passbook actually keeps your tickets! I found old basketball tickets from last season with the QR code on the watch. This would be super useful if you forgot your phone, because you don’t need wifi to open Passbook. Also, since you can screenshot the watch, you could just save a photo of the code.

Overall, having the watch for the last two weeks has been a really cool experience, and I would definitely recommend that you try it out. It’s super useful if you don’t usually keep your phone on your person but have it nearby, or even if you have your phone on you, especially since phones keep getting bigger and bigger. Oh! And the handoff feature is really cool too! That’s when you ask Siri something, and she can’t answer on the watch, you can just switch it to the phone. You do this by enabling the feature in the Apple Watch app on the phone. And OMG, you can save music to the watch! This is a little complicated, and I recommend watching the video online on the Apple Watch website to figure it out, and you need Bluetooth headphones. But basically, link the music through the app, and then switch the source of the music from the phone to the watch. You can switch the source through the settings app.

I had a lot of fun with the phone, and I suggest y’all try it out!! Bye guys!

By: Chris Tonelli

Porschethe famApple Watchthe Cloud
It was an absolutely crazy weekend. As soon as I got out of class on Friday, my watch dinged informing me I had a text–my older sister was here to pick me up, and we were going to my dad’s job’s picnic. When we arrived to what was a food truck rodeo with perks, I immediately got a cupcake, waffle, and had a henna tattoo done. We spent most of the time walking around and eating. We left the picnic after we watching the trapeze show, which was amazing!

The next morning we hopped in the car and went to Wilmington! It was my cousin’s birthday celebration/family get together, and we went to Historic Wilmington and the beach. There was a car show going on in Historic Wilmington, and there was this beautiful old Porsche there. I also got pictures of an owl and hawk–they just looked cool. When we finally got to the beach, we relaxed and used the watch to take pictures! My favorite part was driving home (parents in the other car) and banging out to the music the watch and iPhone 6 were playing.

Sunday was the last day of Sunday School, and I said good bye to my first graders:( and then went to a 2 year old’s birthday where there was this gorgeous arrangement of fruit.

After what was a exhausting weekend, I stayed up doing homework. The watch and phone keeping me company and playing music to keep me going until I finished and dropped into bed. I woke up the next morning with the watch buzzing, informing me I had overslep,t and if I didn’t get up right now, I was going to be late to class and miss my quiz. I rushed to get ready, woke my sister, stole my brother’s keys, got dropped off, and was one minute late to class, but she hadn’t passed the quiz out yet. MADE IT! Shout out to the watch for waking me up just in time. I spent the rest of today in class, doing tomorrow’s homework, and playing catch up after the weekend. I did take a small break after class and sat in front of the lib by the wolf ears and took pics of the sky. It was a beautiful day.

I discovered that you can take screenshots with the apple watch! You just have to press the digital crown and the messages button at the same time. I took a screenshot of the face, which is customizable by the way. I have mine set to a traditional clock face with shortcuts to apps in the corners.  I have the date in the top left, moon phase in the top right, timer in the bottom left, and temperature in the bottom right. I really like this feature, because if (and when) I get bored of the face, I can change it. I originally had a butterfly face that would become a different butterfly every time the watch woke up, but that face didn’t have as many shortcuts. I changed the face by firmly pressing on the screen of the watch and then waiting about 3 seconds until the other options showed up, and I scrolled through them.

trapezePorschefruit sculpture