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Category: event

Jan 29 2014

“NC State Research Around the World” Debuts in iPearl Immersion Theater

Did you know that NC State research happens all over the world? From Peru and Ecuador to Kenya and Jordan, NC State faculty are making a difference. The NC State Research Around the World virtual tour showcases the work of over 25 faculty from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Natural Resources, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Engineering, College of Sciences, and the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Still from "NC State Research Around the World"

Petra, Jordan is one of the many places our faculty work

The Google Earth tour is a new addition to the Libraries’ permanent media portfolio for the James B. Hunt Jr. Library’s video walls. We curate a program of content for the video walls that is focused on demonstrating NC State’s impact. NC State Research Around the World shows the incredible variety of problems that NC State researchers are tackling.

NC State Research Around the World debuts today in the iPearl Immersion Theater on the second floor of Hunt Library and will run continuously through February 6. Come join us as we explore faculty research on 5 continents!

Oct 15 2013

Choose Your Own Adventure at Places & Spaces Exhibit

Interacting with iPad in the Immersion Theater

Select maps using the iPad

We are happy to announce the opening of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to browse a collection of some of the most important scientific visualizations ever produced. Visitors to the exhibit can use an iPad to choose from 80 powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works.

The exhibit runs now through October 27th, and is featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater on the second floor of the Hunt Library.

Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell fascinating stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate. Inspiration is waiting for you at the Hunt Library!

Sep 24 2013

Places & Spaces Puts Science on the Map

logo for Places and Spaces

In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to see some of the most inspired scientific visualizations in history. From October 14th through the 27th, the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit will be featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The October event marks a fascinating symbiosis of content and medium, with the visionary maps that make up Places & Spaces providing a perfect complement to the stunning visual experience of the iPearl Immersion Theater.

Now in its ninth year, the Places & Spaces exhibit has traced the evolution of science maps, featuring the most powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works. Created by leading figures in the natural, physical, and social sciences, scientometrics, visual arts, social and science policymaking, and the humanities, the maps in Places & Spaces allow us to better grasp the abstract contexts, relationships, and dynamism of human systems and collective intelligence. Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate.

History of Science Fiction

"History of Science Fiction" by Ward Shelley is one of the maps in the collection.

Over the course of its nine-year existence, these maps have adorned the walls of some of the most prestigious libraries, museums, and universities around the world (see http://www.scimaps.org/exhibitions/ for a complete listing of venues). By presenting the mapping of science in the context of a more traditional exhibit-going experience, Places & Spaces has brought together two cultural locations—the lab and the gallery—that have often been viewed as ideologically and aesthetically remote.

In keeping, however, with the exhibit’s commitment to both tracing science mapping’s past and offering glimpses of its future, Places & Spaces has partnered with North Carolina State University’s innovative Hunt Library and its state-of-the-art iPearl Immersion Theater to offer a new way to experience this important collection. With its 7×16-foot Christie® MicroTiles® digital display, the iPearl Immersion Theater surrounds viewers with larger-than-life maps of science that are visually arresting from afar and amazingly sharp up close. With media outlets like Time magazine, Ploughshares, Architect magazine, and others placing it at the forefront of a renaissance in library design and capabilities, the Hunt Library is the perfect cutting-edge venue to feature the groundbreaking work of Places & Spaces: Mapping Science.

Aug 08 2013

Don’t Just Read . . .

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)?

NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty.

READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481.

Upcoming programs:

Thursday, February 13 at 7:00 p.m.

27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry
Please join us as contributors to this special collection of essays discuss their pieces.

About the book: 27 Views of Raleigh is a compilation of poetry, essays, short stories and book excerpts of 27 diverse Raleigh writers. It is the most recent edition to an Eno Publishers series that began with 27 Views of Hillsborough and continued with compilations in Chapel Hill, Durham and Asheville.

Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m.

March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

Dr. Blair Kelley, associate professor of History at North Carolina State University, will lead a discussion on March. This graphic novel “is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.” The book was recently named a Coretta Scott King Honor Book by the American Library Association.

Mar 19 2013

My #HuntLibrary contest winners awarded

Miami may have won the ACC basketball tournament, but a different kind of championship was awarded in the Hunt Library auditorium last week. Kimberly Dufresne was awarded the first place prize in the NCSU Libraries’ My #HuntLibrary Instagram photo competition after a fierce competition that lasted two months and had 1,400 entries. The quantity and quality of the photographs made the final selection difficult, but in the end, Kimberly’s photograph was the clear winner. It features the unique visualization technology in the building and symbolically illustrates how the James B. Hunt Jr. Library allows our students to reach new heights. Kimberly, a junior graphic design major, received an iPad Mini at an awards ceremony during halftime of NC State’s first-round game during the ACC tournament.

Kimberly Dufresne receives iPad Mini

Libraries Communications Director David Hiscoe presents iPad Mini to Kimberly Dufresne

My #HuntLibrary Finalists

Left to Right: Mike Nutt, Kimberly Dufresne, David Hiscoe, Megan Wood, Emily Reeves, Torey Kiss, Tammy Wingo

Although the contest is over, we are now beginning the process of ingesting the stunning photographs from the My #HuntLibrary contest into the permanent University archives. Our goal is to add all of the Instagram photos that were tagged #HuntLibrary into our digital collections so that they become a permanent part of the story of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The My #HuntLibrary website will also continue to live on, so don’t forget to keep tagging your beautiful shots of #HuntLibrary!

Here are Kimberly’s winning photo and the five runners-up category winners.

Student chasing birds on MicroTiles video wall

First Place: Kimberly Dufresne

Students lounging on Monumental Stair

Most Creative Photograph: Emily Reeves

Skyline Terrace

Best Architectural Photo: Torey Kiss

Person reading in Rain Garden Reading Lounge

Best Community Photographer: Joshua Rucker

Student studying in Skyline Reading Room

Wolfpack at Work: Mark Malek

Student studying in ball chair

Best Sense of Space: Tammy Wingo

These photographs were also selected as contest Finalists:

Eastern exterior

Chao Wan

Skyline Reading Room

Lauren Lu

Western exterior

Megan Wood

Skyline Reading Room

Tammy Wingo

Detail of glass table

Chris Ragone

Eastern window with birds visible outside

Leonora Shell

Rain Garden Reading Lounge

Tammy Wingo

Hunt Library exterior with clouds

James Gries

Apr 23 2012

Seminar to Explore Student Use of Library Spaces

Annotated map from student interview

Annotated map from student interview

With over 10,000 visits a day, D. H. Hill Library is undoubtedly a popular campus destination, but have you ever wondered exactly what our students do while they are here? Ph.D. student Dana Gierdowski and librarian Kim Duckett turned that question into a research project. Next Monday, April 30, at 11 a.m., they will present their findings in a talk entitled “Assessing Student Perceptions and Uses of Library Spaces” in the Assembly Room of D.H. Hill Library.

Over the past couple of years library staff have used a variety of strategies to understand how students do their work as well as their perceptions and uses of existing library spaces and other non-classroom spaces. This presentation highlights one project which focused on students’ perceptions and use patterns in the variety of new learning spaces in D. H. Hill Library’s West Wing. In this seminar, Gierdowski and Duckett will share an overview of the project and key findings.

Dana Gierdowski is a Doctoral Candidate in the Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media Program at North Carolina State University, where she studies formal and informal learning spaces in higher education.
Kim Duckett is the Principal Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning at the North Carolina State University Libraries.

This seminar is presented by the NCSU Librarians’ Association (NCSULA). NCSULA’s mission is to provide members with professional enrichment opportunities. This event is free and open to the public.

Dec 07 2011

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect Opens at NCSU Libraries

Media Contact: David Hiscoe, NCSU Libraries,  (919) 513-3425
http://lib.ncsu.edu/exhibit/malecha

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to present The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations, an exhibit that features over a decade of work by Marvin J. Malecha, dean of the College of Design at North Carolina State University and former president of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Athena's Nest for Pegasus

Athena's Nest for Pegasus

The exhibit explores and embodies Malecha’s fundamental premise that the act of drawing—no matter the task at hand­—can release the innate powers of our own creativity, often bringing us to a state “when clarity is vividly present and understanding seems painfully obvious. It is a moment when all of the noise of extraneous considerations falls away and purpose is immediately before you.”  The exhibit taps deep roots at NC State, an institution where mechanical crafts have always been taught, valued, and practiced as catalysts for growth and creation.

Dean Malecha has had a multi-faceted career encompassing administration, education, research, professional service, and practice as an architect. After earning a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Minnesota and a Master of Architecture from Harvard University, he was dean of the College of Environmental Design at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, for twelve years before coming to NC State University in 1994.

In addition to his teaching and administrative work, Malecha has written several books on design and has maintained an active involvement with architectural practice through his work on a wide variety of projects—including the new chancellor’s residence under construction on NC State’s Centennial Campus. He is an Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) Distinguished Professor, was awarded the prestigious AIA/ACSA Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education in 2003, and served as President of the AIA from 2008-2009.

Ticino, near Lugano, 1998

Ticino, near Lugano, 1998

The exhibit reflects the strategies that produced Malecha’s recent book, The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: 100 Drawings and Reflections from Many Places, Times, and Spaces (NCSU Libraries Publications in collaboration with the NC State College of Design, 2011), in which a combination of sketches, evocative quotations, and short, impromptu notes or essays intermingle to capture the creative process at work. Always working with a drawing pad close by, Malecha shows how the notepad at hand in travels ranging from Hong Kong to Minnesota is integral to his practice as an architect and educator.  Both his book and the NCSU Libraries’ exhibit ask each of us to “Draw what you see. Draw to understand.  Draw to enhance your skill of seeing.  Draw to remember. . . . It will bring you an acute understanding of who you are.”

Visitors to the exhibit will quite literally be able to follow Malecha’s advice at two kiosks that invite them to draw what they see.  Facing D. H. Hill’s Conservatory and the landscape beyond, viewers at the kiosks are encouraged to add their own creative observations and experiments to the experience of the exhibit. Both traditional sketchbook and pencil and an iPad loaded with the Brushes app so brilliantly used by fellow artists such as David Hockney or Jorge Columbo will allow visitors to draw from life or from their own imaginations—either just for fun or perhaps to reach one of those moments “when clarity is vividly present and understanding seems painfully obvious.”

“I am so proud that the NCSU Libraries has been able to display Dean Malecha’s thought- and eye-provoking project,” says Susan K. Nutter, vice provost and director of the NCSU Libraries. “NC State excels in teaching our students to engage practical problems with a practical and inspired imagination.  Malecha shows us how to do it.   And the exhibit is not only a great entry point to scholars and the general public who aren’t yet aware of the tremendous cache of valuable architectural and design materials that the we hold in our Special Collections Research Center—its multimedia and immersive kiosks are a nice foretaste of the technology that will make our new James B. Hunt Jr. Library such a great place to showcase faculty and student work when we open it in early 2013.”  

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect will be open and free to the public in the D. H. Hill Library Exhibit Gallery during regular hours through December 31.  The exhibit was produced with generous support from the Goodnight Educational Foundation Library Endowment for Special Collections.

Oct 12 2011

NCSU Libraries Friends of the Library Fall Luncheon

Dr. Michael Steer

Please join us for the Friends of the Library annual fall luncheon, Monday, October 31 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the McKimmon Center.

Our featured speaker will be Dr. Michael Steer, the Lampe Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State. Dr. Steer is the recipient of the US Army Commanders Award for Public Service for his work on electronic warfare applications that is credited with saving countless lives in Iraq and Afghanistan.

We will also be honoring the recipient of the twenty-third NCSU Libraries Faculty Award. This award, established in 1989, enables the library to recognize faculty contributions to the efforts of NCSU Libraries. This year’s winner is Dr. Douglas S. Reeves, Professor of Computer Science and Director of Graduate Programs for Computer Science.

Tickets are available:

$20.00 for Friends of the Library members and guests
$25.00 for general public
$10.00 for NC State students

To make your reservation or for more information, please call the Friends of the Library office at (919) 515-2841 or email friends_of_the_library@ncsu.edu.

Oct 05 2011

Langston Hughes Lecture in honor of National Arts and Humanities Month

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture
Thursday, October 13 at 4:00 p.m.
Assembly Room, 2nd floor, East Wing, D. H. Hill Library

Professor Jason Miller

In celebration of National Arts and Humanities Month, associate professor Jason Miller presents a discussion on Langston Hughes and the relationship between America’s neglected history of lynching and some of the world’s most significant poems. In his recently published book, Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture, Miller examines Hughes’ poems on lynching and explores their effects on survivors, victims and perpetrators. Miller will be joined by student Jazmine Davis, who will be performing “Strange Fruit,” a song about lynching made famous by Billie Holiday.

This program is free and open to the public. Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture will be available for on-site purchase and signing. This program is presented in collaboration with the NC State GLBT Center.

Langston Hughes photo credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Carl Van Vechten Collection, [LC-USZ62-92598]

Aug 26 2011

The World Trade Center – A Complicated History

Please join us for a lecture that marks the tenth anniversary of September 11:

The World Trade Center: A Complicated History
a talk by Dr. Kristen J. Schaffer

Thursday, September 8 at 4:00 p.m.
Assembly Room, 2nd floor, East Wing, D. H. Hill Library

Before September 11, 2001, the World Trade Center was a much-criticized complex of buildings. Many in the professional and academic communities, as well as among the general public, saw it as an architectural and urban design failure.

Dr. Kristen J. Schaffer, associate professor of architecture at NC State, will discuss the World Trade Center’s history, its relationship to modern architecture and city planning, and its new role as monument. “This lecture will discuss the World Trade Center as an act of creation, by Americans for Americans,” Schaffer said. “[My presentation] will focus on that act of creation and reception, not on the act of destruction.”

Schaffer further explained her approach by saying, “By looking at the history of the Center’s conception, design, construction, and public reception, we reclaim it as an act of American creation and do not cede the Center’s identity to the act of destruction. By entering into its early history we put aside, for the moment, our knowledge of its end. That is not to say forget, but for the time being suppress our knowledge of the future as we walk along with those who created the towers and who could not know its destiny.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and presented by NCSU Libraries. For more information, call 513-3481 or email marian_fragola@ncsu.edu.