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Category: Headlines

Oct 15 2013

Choose Your Own Adventure at Places & Spaces Exhibit

Interacting with iPad in the Immersion Theater

Select maps using the iPad

We are happy to announce the opening of the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to browse a collection of some of the most important scientific visualizations ever produced. Visitors to the exhibit can use an iPad to choose from 80 powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works.

The exhibit runs now through October 27th, and is featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater on the second floor of the Hunt Library.

Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell fascinating stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate. Inspiration is waiting for you at the Hunt Library!

Sep 24 2013

Places & Spaces Puts Science on the Map

logo for Places and Spaces

In collaboration with Indiana University, NCSU Libraries invites you to see some of the most inspired scientific visualizations in history. From October 14th through the 27th, the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit will be featured in the iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. The October event marks a fascinating symbiosis of content and medium, with the visionary maps that make up Places & Spaces providing a perfect complement to the stunning visual experience of the iPearl Immersion Theater.

Now in its ninth year, the Places & Spaces exhibit has traced the evolution of science maps, featuring the most powerful examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations, and science-inspired art works. Created by leading figures in the natural, physical, and social sciences, scientometrics, visual arts, social and science policymaking, and the humanities, the maps in Places & Spaces allow us to better grasp the abstract contexts, relationships, and dynamism of human systems and collective intelligence. Individually and as a whole, the maps of Places & Spaces allow data to tell stories which both the scientist and the layperson can understand and appreciate.

History of Science Fiction

"History of Science Fiction" by Ward Shelley is one of the maps in the collection.

Over the course of its nine-year existence, these maps have adorned the walls of some of the most prestigious libraries, museums, and universities around the world (see http://www.scimaps.org/exhibitions/ for a complete listing of venues). By presenting the mapping of science in the context of a more traditional exhibit-going experience, Places & Spaces has brought together two cultural locations—the lab and the gallery—that have often been viewed as ideologically and aesthetically remote.

In keeping, however, with the exhibit’s commitment to both tracing science mapping’s past and offering glimpses of its future, Places & Spaces has partnered with North Carolina State University’s innovative Hunt Library and its state-of-the-art iPearl Immersion Theater to offer a new way to experience this important collection. With its 7×16-foot Christie® MicroTiles® digital display, the iPearl Immersion Theater surrounds viewers with larger-than-life maps of science that are visually arresting from afar and amazingly sharp up close. With media outlets like Time magazine, Ploughshares, Architect magazine, and others placing it at the forefront of a renaissance in library design and capabilities, the Hunt Library is the perfect cutting-edge venue to feature the groundbreaking work of Places & Spaces: Mapping Science.

Aug 22 2013

Two New Library Tutorial Videos

Two new animation videos are now available on the library website. These videos will help students as they begin the library research process.

Picking Your Topic video screen shot

Picking Your Topic IS Research (3:10) describes how picking a topic isn’t set in stone from the get-go. You tweak and refine as you do research. It emphasizes the research process.
From Idea to Library (2:28) tells the story of how an idea goes from a researcher to publication as an article in a journal and how it becomes discoverable in article databases through the library. We hope it helps students better understand the distinctions between an article, a journal, and a database.

You can find these and other tutorials here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/

Let your librarian know if you have comments or questions about these videos or suggestions for other tutorial topics.

Aug 08 2013

Don’t Just Read . . .

Looking for an opportunity to discuss the latest popular books with some of the smartest people around (your friends and North Carolina State University’s most engaged scholars)?

NCSU Libraries and Wake County Public Libraries teamed up to make that easy with READ SMART, a series of informal discussions moderated by members of NC State’s faculty.

READ SMART is free and open to the public and is sponsored by Friends of the Library of North Carolina State University. All discussions are held at the Cameron Village Regional Library, 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605. For more information, please call 919-513-3481.

Upcoming programs:

Thursday, February 13 at 7:00 p.m.

27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry
Please join us as contributors to this special collection of essays discuss their pieces.

About the book: 27 Views of Raleigh is a compilation of poetry, essays, short stories and book excerpts of 27 diverse Raleigh writers. It is the most recent edition to an Eno Publishers series that began with 27 Views of Hillsborough and continued with compilations in Chapel Hill, Durham and Asheville.

Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m.

March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell

Dr. Blair Kelley, associate professor of History at North Carolina State University, will lead a discussion on March. This graphic novel “is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.” The book was recently named a Coretta Scott King Honor Book by the American Library Association.

Feb 12 2013

My #HuntLibrary iPad Mini contest ends February 22


The My #HuntLibrary photo contest has been a huge success! The NC State community has contributed over 1200 Instagram images to the project, simply by adding the hashtag #HuntLibrary to their Instagram photos. This crowdsourced photo project has really captured the spirit of the Hunt Library and has been a great way to introduce it to the world. While the My #HuntLibrary website will live on, the contest will end at 11:59PM February 22, 2013.

The winner will be selected by a jury of librarians from among the most popular photographs in My #HuntLibrary. The popularity score is determined by a combination of battle wins and “likes” on the photograph. Please note – likes on Instagram do not count towards the popularity score! “Likes” have to be submitted on the My #HuntLibrary app. Also, only public images taken with Instagram are eligible to win the iPad Mini. We currently don’t have the ability to include pictures from other social media sites or private photos on Instagram.

iPad Mini

The winner will be awarded and recognized at an upcoming NCSU Libraries Student Advisory Board meeting.

The iPad Mini isn’t the only reason to participate! NCSU Libraries will preserve the best #HuntLibrary photos forever in the University’s official digital archives so they become a permanent part of NC State history. If your photo is selected, watch for a comment from us on your #HuntLibrary photo!

iphone taking photo of the Hunt Library

To browse #HuntLibrary photos, vote on your favorites, and see complete contest rules and terms of use, head to My #HuntLibrary at http://go.ncsu.edu/myhunt!

Any questions? Email myhuntlibrary@lists.ncsu.edu.

Jan 02 2013

Show the World Your New Library and Win an iPad Mini

iphone taking photo of the Hunt LibraryYou’ve been waiting patiently for the James B. Hunt Jr. Library to open, and today is the big day! Now we want everyone to see the library of the future . . . through your Instagram photos!

NCSU Libraries is happy to announce the My #HuntLibrary photo contest. Through My #HuntLibrary you can participate in the story of the Hunt Library’s opening . . . and one lucky photographer will win an iPad Mini!

Participating in My #HuntLibrary is easy:

  1. Take an awesome Hunt Library photo
  2. Upload it to Instagram
  3. Tag it #HuntLibrary

At go.ncsu.edu/myhunt you can also vote on your favorite #HuntLibrary photos, see popular images, browse staff picks, and more. One of the most popular #HuntLibrary shutterbugs will win an iPad Mini, and NCSU Libraries will preserve the best #HuntLibrary photos forever in the University’s official digital archives so they become a permanent part of NC State history.

A Different Point of View

Have fun, be creative! Show us a feature that you love or a view that takes your breath away. Here are some ideas to get you going:

  • Use Virtual Browse & the bookBot for the first time
  • Lounge on the Skyline Terrace
  • Get Roman on the Monumental Stairs
  • Draw a giant picture in the Idea Alcove
  • Strike a pose in a cool chair
  • Get collaborative in a group study room
  • Immerse yourself in the Immersion Theater
  • Hang out in the Learning Commons

iPad MiniTo browse #HuntLibrary photos, vote on your favorites, and see complete contest rules and terms of use, head to My #HuntLibrary at http://go.ncsu.edu/myhunt!

Any questions? Email myhuntlibrary@lists.ncsu.edu.

Mar 22 2012

Roll out the red carpet—the best of the 2012 NCSU Libraries Super Bowl Commercials

Libraries' director of communications David Hiscoe congratulates first place winner Vann Dwiggins

Libraries' director of communications David Hiscoe congratulates first place winner Vann Dwiggins

In the fall semester of 2012, NC State University students were challenged to create a “Super Bowl Commercial” for the NCSU Libraries, a video that “captures what the NCSU Libraries means to you, to your friends, to NC State, to North Carolina, to the world—to any or all of these.”  We received a ton of great entries, all of which in one way or another caught, as we had asked, “the essence of the spirit of the NCSU Libraries.”

We had a great time watching the entries as they came in—and wanted to give everyone else a chance to enjoy the best of the best.  A big “thanks” to all of you who submitted videos–and get your cameras ready for next year, when we’ll ask you what you think of the new Hunt Library.

 

First Prize
Vann Dwiggins—Learn to Fall in Love All Over Again
The surprise ended brought the medal home for Vann.

 

 

 

 

 

Second Prize
Chris Lange—What Does D. H. Hill Library Mean to NC State Students?
An epic struggle with whiteboard whales and other contemplative adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

Third Prize
Kairsten Fay and Max Feldman—NCSU Libraries
A swirling tour of the best of D. H. Hill.




 

 

 

The Contenders

Adaria Coulter—Ideas Should Be Free
A probing sense of thoughtfulness about the ultimate place of libraries in the modern world.

Graham Dean—A Place to . . .
Stop-motion photography captures the frantic nature (and silent study) that dominates the scene at the D. H. Hill Library.

Daniel Gallagher, Cameron McCarty, and Julia Venegas—There’s a Book for That
One for whatever information you need. You’ll want to especially check out the “Hair Style Cool-O-Meter.

Miles Holst—The Library Show
Books and more, with a retro approach and sly, shy style.

Corey Howard—D. H. Hill People
An arch sense of humor and a wolf costume to die for.

Sana Hussain—It’s Not Over
Brings home an “A+”.

Edward Lane—The Key to Success
Explores what happens when you ask an “astro-bio-chemical (with physics)” professor how to do well at a technologically advanced university like NC State.

Alyssa Riddle—DH Dance
Definitely shows us that D. H. Hill is for more than just studying. Watching the crowd reactions is half the fun.

Jacqueline Marie Yanchocik—What Will You Find Next?
Explores the D. H. Hill Library as a center for community, learning, and scholarship.

 

Dec 07 2011

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect Opens at NCSU Libraries

Media Contact: David Hiscoe, NCSU Libraries,  (919) 513-3425
http://lib.ncsu.edu/exhibit/malecha

The NCSU Libraries is pleased to present The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations, an exhibit that features over a decade of work by Marvin J. Malecha, dean of the College of Design at North Carolina State University and former president of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Athena's Nest for Pegasus

Athena's Nest for Pegasus

The exhibit explores and embodies Malecha’s fundamental premise that the act of drawing—no matter the task at hand­—can release the innate powers of our own creativity, often bringing us to a state “when clarity is vividly present and understanding seems painfully obvious. It is a moment when all of the noise of extraneous considerations falls away and purpose is immediately before you.”  The exhibit taps deep roots at NC State, an institution where mechanical crafts have always been taught, valued, and practiced as catalysts for growth and creation.

Dean Malecha has had a multi-faceted career encompassing administration, education, research, professional service, and practice as an architect. After earning a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Minnesota and a Master of Architecture from Harvard University, he was dean of the College of Environmental Design at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, for twelve years before coming to NC State University in 1994.

In addition to his teaching and administrative work, Malecha has written several books on design and has maintained an active involvement with architectural practice through his work on a wide variety of projects—including the new chancellor’s residence under construction on NC State’s Centennial Campus. He is an Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) Distinguished Professor, was awarded the prestigious AIA/ACSA Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education in 2003, and served as President of the AIA from 2008-2009.

Ticino, near Lugano, 1998

Ticino, near Lugano, 1998

The exhibit reflects the strategies that produced Malecha’s recent book, The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: 100 Drawings and Reflections from Many Places, Times, and Spaces (NCSU Libraries Publications in collaboration with the NC State College of Design, 2011), in which a combination of sketches, evocative quotations, and short, impromptu notes or essays intermingle to capture the creative process at work. Always working with a drawing pad close by, Malecha shows how the notepad at hand in travels ranging from Hong Kong to Minnesota is integral to his practice as an architect and educator.  Both his book and the NCSU Libraries’ exhibit ask each of us to “Draw what you see. Draw to understand.  Draw to enhance your skill of seeing.  Draw to remember. . . . It will bring you an acute understanding of who you are.”

Visitors to the exhibit will quite literally be able to follow Malecha’s advice at two kiosks that invite them to draw what they see.  Facing D. H. Hill’s Conservatory and the landscape beyond, viewers at the kiosks are encouraged to add their own creative observations and experiments to the experience of the exhibit. Both traditional sketchbook and pencil and an iPad loaded with the Brushes app so brilliantly used by fellow artists such as David Hockney or Jorge Columbo will allow visitors to draw from life or from their own imaginations—either just for fun or perhaps to reach one of those moments “when clarity is vividly present and understanding seems painfully obvious.”

“I am so proud that the NCSU Libraries has been able to display Dean Malecha’s thought- and eye-provoking project,” says Susan K. Nutter, vice provost and director of the NCSU Libraries. “NC State excels in teaching our students to engage practical problems with a practical and inspired imagination.  Malecha shows us how to do it.   And the exhibit is not only a great entry point to scholars and the general public who aren’t yet aware of the tremendous cache of valuable architectural and design materials that the we hold in our Special Collections Research Center—its multimedia and immersive kiosks are a nice foretaste of the technology that will make our new James B. Hunt Jr. Library such a great place to showcase faculty and student work when we open it in early 2013.”  

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect will be open and free to the public in the D. H. Hill Library Exhibit Gallery during regular hours through December 31.  The exhibit was produced with generous support from the Goodnight Educational Foundation Library Endowment for Special Collections.

Nov 04 2011

Mobile App Provides Walking Tour of African American History at NC State University

Media Contact: David Hiscoe, NCSU Libraries, (919) 513-3425

home screen of Red, White & BlackThe North Carolina State University Libraries is proud to release Red, White & Black, a new mobile web app that allows users to employ their smart phones and other mobile devices to embark on a self-guided walking tour that highlights the rich history of African Americans at NC State (www.lib.ncsu.edu/m/exhibits/redwhiteblack).

From 1939 when Ellen McGuire, a former slave who retired from NC State after working for fifty years mostly in the infirmary, to 1957 when Robert Clemons became the first African American to graduate from the university (with a professional degree in electrical engineering), to 2010 when students were confronted with racial epithets painted in the Freedom Expression Tunnel, this walking tour allows users to explore, at their own pace, spaces on NC State’s campus that have had significant impact on the lives and experiences of African American students, employees, and the larger community.

This tour integrates extensive existing digital collections from the NCSU Libraries with student research and student readings to provide access to events, images, and stories that help to tell this important history. The location-aware web app allows students to connect with university history in the places in which they learn every day, further engaging them with the people, events, and environment that have shaped their campus. Owners of devices that do not support GPS or other location-detection methods can still manually navigate through the website to enjoy a historical tour of African American history and achievement at NC State.

app screenshot showing audio capabilitiesRed, White & Black builds on the success of the April 2011 in-person guided walking tour. A collaboration of the NCSU Libraries, the Department of History, and the African American Cultural Center, the original walk began with a discussion, led by Dr. Blair Kelley of the Department of History, focusing on the long civil rights movement in higher education.  The talk was followed by a walking tour of campus, led by Dr. Walter Jackson from the Department of History and by Ms. Toni Thorpe of the African American Cultural Center—and concluded at the African American Cultural Center where participants had an opportunity to reflect together on the university’s history. The first walk was so well received and attended that the NCSU Libraries wished to make it available on a wider and on-demand basis.

A similar in-person tour of the places on campus that have had significant impact on the lives and experiences of African American students and the community will be led by Dr. Jackson and Ms. Thorpe on November 7, 2011, beginning at 4:30 p.m. on the steps of the D. H. Hill Library. This program is free and open to the public.

According to Greg Raschke, associate director for collections and scholarly communication at the Libraries, “as the official repository for the university, the University Archives in the NCSU Libraries has mountains of incredibly interesting material about the past here at NC State.  The Red, White & Black app contains history that everyone should know, and the mobile app gives us a great new way to extend the reach of our archives and give the university community and the people of North Carolina even more value from the history that we collect for them.”

app screenshot showing map of campusRed, White & Black is the second mobile tour of the NC State campus developed by the NCSU Libraries. WolfWalk, released in 2010, provides a comprehensive self-guided historical walk through NC State’s campus and is available as iPhone and iPad apps as a free download from the App Store.

“The NCSU Libraries embraces the role of incubating new technologies for the university and for the library community around the world,” says Susan K. Nutter, vice provost and director of the NCSU Libraries.  “Looking forward, we see mobile technologies playing a key role in the services we offer.  WolfWalk and the new Red, White & Black app give us great experience that we’ll put to good use in the new James B. Hunt Jr. Library (www.lib.ncsu.edu/huntlibrary).”

Oct 12 2011

NCSU Libraries Friends of the Library Fall Luncheon

Dr. Michael Steer

Please join us for the Friends of the Library annual fall luncheon, Monday, October 31 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the McKimmon Center.

Our featured speaker will be Dr. Michael Steer, the Lampe Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State. Dr. Steer is the recipient of the US Army Commanders Award for Public Service for his work on electronic warfare applications that is credited with saving countless lives in Iraq and Afghanistan.

We will also be honoring the recipient of the twenty-third NCSU Libraries Faculty Award. This award, established in 1989, enables the library to recognize faculty contributions to the efforts of NCSU Libraries. This year’s winner is Dr. Douglas S. Reeves, Professor of Computer Science and Director of Graduate Programs for Computer Science.

Tickets are available:

$20.00 for Friends of the Library members and guests
$25.00 for general public
$10.00 for NC State students

To make your reservation or for more information, please call the Friends of the Library office at (919) 515-2841 or email friends_of_the_library@ncsu.edu.