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By: Virginia Ferris

The demolition of Harrelson Hall, the first cylindrical building to ever be built on a university campus, has been a topic of conversation this summer, stirring up a mix of emotions among students, alumni, and faculty who remember the building.

In the coming weeks, we will bring you a series of posts highlighting the life of one of the most provocative buildings on campus.  For now, enjoy the images of Harrelson below and explore our digitized collections and follow us on Twitter for more!  And as always, contact us if you have questions or are interested in using these items or any other materials in the Special Collections Research Center.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Harrelson Hall under construction, circa 1960.

Harrelson Hall under construction, circa 1960.

Hallway in Harrelson Hall during construction, circa 1960.

Hallway in Harrelson Hall during construction, circa 1960.

Aerial view of University Plaza, Harrelson Hall, and surrounding buildings, 1967.

Aerial view of University Plaza, Harrelson Hall, and surrounding buildings, 1967.

A classroom in Harrelson Hall.

A classroom in Harrelson Hall.

Interior view of ramp around core of Harrelson Hall.

Interior view of ramp around core of Harrelson Hall.

Student in Harrelson Hall ramp.

Student in Harrelson Hall ramp.

By: Laura Abraham

We here at NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Research Center want to help you beat the heat with these images taken of kids at 4-H summer camps. Our Rare and Unique Digital Collections has a great amount of materials related to the history and activities of the NC Cooperative Extension, an organization which includes the Department of 4-H Youth Development. The images below were taken at North Carolina summer camps established through the Cooperative Extension, where 4-H children could find education and recreation during their vacation months.

You can find more images related to 4-H camps here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

By: Virginia Ferris

NC State ice cream video created by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

NC State ice cream video created by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

July is National Ice Cream Month!  Click the image above to view a video from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Audiovisual Collection, showing a look behind the scenes of NC State’s campus creamery.  Howling Cow ice cream is still made and enjoyed on campus today (available in both D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Jr. Library), especially during the dog days of summer.

Explore our digitized collections for more ice cream-related materials from the archives!

Guilford County 4-H Club girls selling ice cream to the picnic to send delegates to Short Course, August 1, 1941.

Guilford County 4-H Club girls selling ice cream to the picnic to send delegates to Short Course, August 1, 1941.

Patricia Simonds, Dairy Princess 1957, with cup of N.C. State College ice cream during Dairy Month

Patricia Simonds, Dairy Princess 1957, with cup of N.C. State College ice cream during Dairy Month

Boy and girl eating ice cream, 1956.

Boy and girl eating ice cream, 1956.

By: Brian Dietz

Fireworks of NC State Fairgrounds, Matthew Nowicki, 1949
The Fourth is off to a dreary start in the Triangle. If the rain keeps you at home, or you can’t make it out to view your local fireworks for some other reason, perhaps this drawing, in crayon, of fireworks over the North Carolina State Fairgrounds, 1949, from the Matthew Nowicki Drawings and Other Material, will tide you over. This is one of many drawings completed for the fairgrounds, all of which are amazing and open for researchers to view.

Contact the Special Collections Research Center for an appointment to view this or any other collection. Have a happy Fourth.

By: Laura Abraham

The Special Collections Research Center would like to wish everyone a wonderful Independence Day, or as The Technician phrased it in July 2, 1923, “Let’s Have a Sane and Glorious Fourth!!”

To help with your weekend’s sanity and gloriousness, here are other issues of the Technician newspaper with July Fourth articles:

To view more issues of  NC State’s Technician student newspaper, please visit our digitized collection of the first 70 years of the publication. If you want to see more images from the Special Collections Research Center, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Enjoy your Independence Day and have safe travels and festivities!

By: Linda Sellars

In the Special Collections Research Center, we acquire and build unique collections that document historical and contemporary aspects of fields of study that are strengths for NC State University so that researchers will be able to find and use them now and in the future. To preserve these valuable collections, we store them carefully, using acid-free materials and in climate-controlled buildings. In order for people to find and use these collections, we organize them, describe them, and publish those descriptions on the worldwide web.

Descriptions are the first step in making collections usable for researchers. They are the maps that lead researchers to the materials of interest to them. Organizing and rehousing also help to make collections usable. Some collections come to us well-organized and clearly labeled. These were often taken right out of filing cabinets, packed in boxes, and shipped to us. Other collections have traveled convoluted paths to reach us, paths that may have involved being packed up quickly for a move, being packed by relatives or friends of the collection creators, being shifted from one kind of box to another so that similar records don’t stay together, or being stored for some time in attics or basements.

Box as received, before organizing and rehousing

One of the satisfactions of archival processing work, the work of organizing, rehousing and describing collections for research use, is seeing the visible difference that is made when collections are organized and rehoused. A collection stored in acid-free boxes and folders, neatly labeled, and described on the web is much more user-friendly than a disorganized box or collection. We haven’t yet processed all of our boxes, but our goal is to make all of our collections very user-friendly!

Box after organizing and rehousing

To learn more about our collections, please consult our collection guides.

By: Gwynn Thayer

On May 16, 1950, the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright visited the School of Design at NC State University and spoke to over 5,000 people at Reynolds Coliseum for an architecture lecture. He even stayed with Dean Henry Kamphoefner at his modernist home in Raleigh. In the photograph above, from Special Collections, Wright is pictured walking with Dean Kamphoefner. North Carolina Modernist Houses has provided a full account of his visit to campus.

Unfortunately, a recording of this important lecture has never been located.  North Carolina Modernist Houses has been on a quest to find one. Can you help?

If you have any leads, please contact Special Collections or North Carolina Modernist Houses.

By: Todd Stoffer

In the past five and a half months we have preserved a total of 204 gigabytes of website data, including over 6 million individual web documents from 247 individual seed URLs. In an attempt to better contextualize the websites we have chosen to preserve we have launched our NCSU Libraries Web Archiving Website. This site gives researchers an overview of the project and works as a portal into our collections. While all of our archived web content is available directly through the Archive-It portal, we felt it was important to be able to provide a little more context about the seed URLs than was possible on that platform. Our site allows us to place links to archived web content, live web content, and related finding aids in one centralized location.

In addition to launching our web archiving site we have also begun adding seed URLs to three additional web archive collections. These collections are the Architecture and Design collection, the Landscape Architecture collection and the James B. Hunt Jr. Library Impact collection. The Architecture and Design collection and the Landscape Architecture collection are meant to enhance our existing collections in these areas. They include personal and professional websites of prominent practitioners in those fields, as well as the websites of their companies. While these two collections are currently quite small we have been able to preserve the websites of Alexander Isley, Frank Harmon, Greenways Inc., The Greenway Team, and NC Rail Trails. We will look to expand these collections as we work with other donors in these areas to identify and capture their web content.

The third new collection that we have launched is the James B. Hunt Jr. Library Impact collection, which contains web pages dedicated to documenting the opening of the James B. Hunt Jr. Library and the ongoing impact it has had throughout our community and beyond. The URLs for this collection were gathered by library staff documenting known articles that were published as well as by extracting URLs from tweets related to the James B. Hunt Jr. Library. It contains articles from a wide variety of sources including magazines, newspapers, blogs, and social media. This collection will continue to grow with as new articles are published about Hunt Library.

By: James Stewart

Map of tobacco and cotton plant pathology demonstrations. From 1954 annual report.

Many NC Cooperative Extension Service annual reports now digitized in the Better Living Collection can be a fascinating introduction to the agricultural sciences. One of these sciences is phytopathology, or plant pathology, the scientific study of diseases in plants caused by pathogens (infectious organisms like bacteria), environmental conditions, and physiological factors.

The Cooperative Extension Service extended the life of N.C. field crops by demonstrating new scientific techniques to farmers designed to combat these factors.  This helped save farms from losing thousands of dollars in crops each year. Howard R. Garriss, an early extension plant pathologist, was also the lead author of these reports. Reading Garriss’s reports shows the various teaching methods and scientific techniques used by the extension service.

Cropped section from cover of the 1946 Plant Pathology Annual Report.

Section from cover of the 1946 Plant Pathology Annual Report.

A good example of how extension agents operated is illustrated in the “Tobacco Diseases” section of his 1946 report. Tobacco is listed first in each report perhaps reflecting the importance of that crop to the agricultural economy of N.C. One of the most troubling pathogens to tobacco growers that year was downy mildew, or blue mold. Garriss documents how growers were very receptive to small group meetings and method demonstrations (step by step presentations) on using Fermate spray to kill the mold. He also documents the use of what were called “result demonstrations”, a method that used recorded evidence of the effectiveness of a new scientific method after a certain amount of time.

Circular letters, publications, publicity, and exhibits at the NC State Fair are also detailed in the plant pathology reports as successful ways to instruct farmers. In addition to tobacco, the reports address diseases of peanuts, cotton, small grains, vegetables and fruits. Other pests to crops like the nematode and Black Shank are described as well as their recommended treatments.

Resources related to plant pathology or plant diseases and other agricultural sciences are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to other topics. Additionally, our Historic State Department of Plant Pathology timeline is a rich resource for more information about the development of this science in NC.

By: Gwynn Thayer

The Special Collections Research Center has just acquired a drawing by former NC State faculty member Duncan Stuart. Stuart was one of the founding faculty members of the School (now College) of Design. The drawing was donated by one of Stuart’s former students, who studied architecture at the School of Design in the early 1970s.

Stuart (1919-2001) was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and studied at the University of Oklahoma, Chouinard Art Institute, and Yale University. He served in World War II as a cartographer. In 1948 he was appointed by Dean Henry Kamphoefner as associate professor. During his long and distinguished career Stuart’s works were exhibited at a number of institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Chicago Art Institute. He worked in the 1950s on the geodesic dome and with Synergetics, Inc.

Stuart was known and recognized as an outstanding teacher, and during his career received the Distinguished Professor Award at NC State. On August 29, 1965, he was announced as the “Tar Heel of the Week” by the Raleigh News & Observer. The article included many quotes from former students, one of whom noted, “He was intent on teaching us to think for ourselves.” Another observed that, “He always seemed interested in us as individuals, not just as members of the class. He would talk to us about what we were doing and the conversation was two-way communication, not one-way.”

Stay tuned for more information about this drawing as we process this item and prepare the finding aid for access. The image above is a close view of the image, which is on paper and measures approximately 36″ by 36″. For more information about Architecture and Design collections in Special Collections, please visit our website.