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By: Todd Kosmerick

Terry Waugh, 1958

Edward Walter “Terry” Waugh is usually credited with the circular design concept for NC State’s Harrelson Hall, which was recently demolished.  To follow up from last week’s post, here are a few more facts about him.

He was born on 24 January 1913 in Johannesburg, South Africa.  During the 1930s he attended the School of Architecture at Edinburgh College of Art and Heriot Watt College of Engineering in Scotland, and he received the equivalent of a BA in 1935 and MA in 1938.

During World War II he came to the United States.  In 1944-1945 he had a fellowship at Cranbrook Academy, and he briefly worked under Eliel Saarinen.  In 1945-1946 he was a senior designer of movie sets for Columbia Picture, Inc.  He was a practicing architect for a few years in Kansas City, and in 1949 he and George Matsumoto designed the Kansas City Art Institute.  He also briefly taught architecture at the University of Kansas and the University of Oklahoma.

In September 1948 he became an associate professor of architecture in NC State’s School (now College) of Design.  He was among the original cohort of faculty and students that had come with Dean Henry Kamphoefner from the University of Oklahoma.  He taught at NC State during 1948-1951 and again 1958-1962.  During his second employment at the university, he performed additional duties as campus planner.

From 1951 to 1958 he was in private practice in Raleigh.  In 1960, he and his wife Elizabeth authored (with Henry Kamphoefner, advisor) the book The South Builds:  New Architecture in the Old South. During his career he also wrote a number of articles.  In 1965 he showed his paintings and drawings at an exhibit titled “Two Years of Architecture and Art” in NC State’s student union.

In addition to Harrelson Hall (designed with Holloway-Reeves), Waugh contributed to the design of various renovation projects on the NC State campus; to the Winston-Salem War Memorial Coliseum (with G. Milton Small); and the Forest Hills Shopping Center (with Raymond Sawyer) in Garner, North Carolina.  He also designed several houses in North Carolina (many featured on the NC Modernist Houses website), including his own at 3211 Churchill Road in Raleigh.  Through an arrangement between NC State and the government of Peru, Waugh design the campus for La Molina University (Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina) in that country.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Terry Waugh died in Raleigh on 24 February 1966. Architectural drawings for some of his buildings still exist.  Drawings and other documents about the design of NC State’s recently-demolished Harrelson Hall are included in the NCSU Office of the University Architect Records (UA 003.026) and the Holloway-Reeves Records (MC 00172).  Drawings for other Waugh-designed buildings also exist in the Edward Walter Waugh Drawings (MC 00148).

Aug 17 2016

Welcome Pack!

By: Jennifer Baker

The Special Collections Research Center would like to offer a sincere welcome to all new and returning students!

If you’ve never used the Special Collections Research Center before – maybe this is the year! As a repository for primary source documents, the Special Collections Research Center is a one of a kind resource. Our collecting areas reflect the strengths of the university – Architecture and Design, Veterinary Medicine and Forestry and Environmental Sciences are only a few. Did you know we also have collections in the areas of Agricultural Innovation, Animal Rights and Welfare, and Zoological Health? How about History of Computing, Textiles, Plant and Crop Sciences, Engineering, Entomology and Landscape Architecture?

Each collecting area has anywhere from just a few to several hundred collections. These collections are organized and searchable through collection guides, which provide a basic inventory of the contents of a collection. Collection guides allow you to narrow your search from several hundred possible boxes to just a few – something that can make a huge difference in the amount of material you have to go through!

The Special Collections Research Center also has a fantastic site for digitized materials. The Rare and Unique Digital Collections page hosts thousands of digitized items. University Archives photographs can be found here, along with architectural drawings, student organization constitutions, and Cooperative Extension materials to name just a few.  NCSU sports lovers can also view photographs and coaches’ films taken from the bleachers and used for training purposes.

N.C. State vs. University of Houston in the 1983 NCAA Championship

In short, the Special Collections Research Center has a wealth of material available to the campus community. We hope to see you soon!

For more information on accessing materials in the Special Collections Research Center, please contact us at library_specialcollections@ncsu.edu

By: Todd Kosmerick

Harrelson Hall floorplan, 1959

With demolition completed recently, the landmark Harrelson Hall is at an end.  We wanted to continuing looking back at its earliest days, and we developed the timeline below to show how the building came to be created:

1957

The North Carolina General Assembly authorized construction of a new classroom building on the NC State campus.

Plans were developed for the new classroom building to be circular.

August 1957

The Building and Grounds Committee approved the space between Polk and Williams Halls as the location of the new classroom building. 

February 1959

The Board of Trustees approved the official naming of the new classroom building as Harrelson Hall in honor of Chancellor John W. Harrelson.

Architecture professor Terry Waugh was responsible for Harrelson Hall's circular design.

March 1959

Architectural plans for Harrelson Hall were released to the public.  The architects were Holloway-Reeves and Associates, aided by architecture faculty member E. W. “Terry” Waugh.  Waugh was responsible for the circular design concept, believed to enclose the largest amount of space with the least amount of materials, a necessary requirement during a time of teacher shortages and increasing enrollment.  The pie-slice shapes of interior spaces was thought to make perfect classrooms, some of which could hold 200 students.

1960

Plans for the “round classroom building” were finalized; construction began.  T. A. Loving and Company was the general contractor.  Concrete was a major material used in construction; some parts of the building were precast and others poured in place.

Containing the bathrooms and spiral ramp, the core of the building was constructed first.

The core of the building (including the bathrooms, utilities, and ramp) was constructed first.

1961

Construction was completed.  The university stated the final cost was $2,250,000 (later that was revised down to $1,990,000).  At first the university claimed the building’s 77 classrooms could hold 4,500 students.  This may have been overly optimistic; a few years later, the campus facilities office stated that Harrelson Hall could seat only 3,254 students.  Nevertheless, both numbers are impressive because a total of 7,117 students were enrolled at NC State during the Fall 1961 semester.

November 1961

The public first glimpsed the inside of the building.  Only one floor was completely furnished for an open house on November 4.  At another open house on November 18 as part of Homecoming festivities, 1,200 people filed through the building.  While most comments were favorable, some criticism was noted:  people complained of noisy steam pipes, a lack of bathrooms for women (there was only one), and potential dangers with the ramp.  Some noted that it took significantly longer to walk the ramp than climb the stairs.

Harrelson Hall nearing completion in 1961

The Department of Mathematics was the first unit to move into the building.

February-March 1962

Students had already begun calling the building “The Pie” and having fun with it:  the February 8 Technician reported on a student roller skating down the ramp.  Landscaping was still incomplete, and students and faculty complained of mud and weeds surrounding the building (it would be five more years before the Brickyard was constructed).  Over time, complaints about the building mounted, including noisy air conditioning, curved chalkboards, and disorienting corridors and ramps.

7 March 1962

The building was officially dedicated as part of NC State’s 75th anniversary ceremonies and the 100th anniversary of the Morrill Act creating land-grant colleges and universities.

April 1962

The Building and Grounds Committee recommended funds for landscaping around Harrelson Hall and development of detailed landscaping plans for the open space nearby.

By: Laura Abraham

This Friday is the start of NC State’s Wolfpack Welcome Week, the traditional event to welcome new students, helping them adjust to life on campus and prepare for their upcoming class schedules, as well as greet returning students. NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center would like to commemorate the new semester with a sampling of images from digitized materials in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

For those unfamiliar with the Special Collections Research Center, we hold and manage the University’s unique archival materials, and you can find us in the D. H. Hill Library. We have a large digitized collection of Special Collections materials available online. This includes images like these, where students from years past are moving into their dorms, attending student orientation, and registering for classes.

We hope this school year goes wonderfully for you! If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. If you are interested in learning more about our materials or viewing them, please see information on using Special Collections materials and use our Special Collections Request Form.

By: Virginia Ferris

With the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Olympics last week, we’re taking a look back at the legacy of members of the NC State Wolfpack who have been part of past Olympic games.  This year we’re cheering on four NC State swimmers participating in the 2016 Olympic games in Rio: Anton Ipsen, Simonas Bilis Soren Dahl, and Ryan Held – and celebrating Held’s gold medal in yesterday’s 4 x 100 relay!

Olympic Gold Medalist Steve Rerych.

Olympic Gold Medalist Steve Rerych.

Swimmer Steve Rerych won medals at the Mexico City Olympics for the 4 x 100 freestyle and 4 x 200 freestyle. At NC State Rerych had been a three-time All-American and nine-time ACC champion. He is the only person in ACC swimming and diving history to be three-time champion in three different events. Rerych was inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 1993 and the NC State Athletics Hall of Fame in 2014.

Tommy Burleson was from Newland, North Carolina. He wa a member of the U.S. Olympic basketball team that won a silver medal in Munich, 1972.

Tommy Burleson was from Newland, North Carolina. He wa a member of the U.S. Olympic basketball team that won a silver medal in Munich, 1972.

Kenny Carr won a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic basketball team in Montreal, 1976.

Kenny Carr won a gold medal with the U.S. Olympic basketball team in Montreal, 1976.

Steve Gregg, Harrigan, and Goodhew swam for NCSU in the early 1970s. Steve Gregg won a silver medal for the 200 butterfly, Dan Harrigan won a bronze medal for the 200 back stroke and Duncan Goodhew, who swam for Great Britain, won a gold medal for the 100 breast stroke.

Steve Gregg, Harrigan, and Goodhew swam for NCSU in the early 1970s. Steve Gregg won a silver medal for the 200 butterfly, Dan Harrigan won a bronze medal for the 200 back stroke and Duncan Goodhew, who swam for Great Britain, won a gold medal for the 100 breast stroke.

In the 1975 Pan American Games held in Mexico City, Steve Gregg won the silver medal in the 200 meter butterfly, and Dan Harrigan won the gold medal in the 200 meter backstroke. In the 1976 Olympics, Gregg won silver in the 200 meter Butterfly, while Harrigan won bronze in the 200 meter backstroke. Both swam for NC State in the early 1970s, including on the 1973 team that won all eighteen events at the ACC tournament.

Steve Gregg and Dan Harrigan, 1975 Pan American Games medalists.

Steve Gregg and Dan Harrigan, 1975 Pan American Games medalists.

Tab Ramos played for North Carolina State University during the 1980s. He played for the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team in 1988 at the Summer Olympics and continued to play for the National Team until 2000. He has been named U.S. Soccer Player of the Year (1990) and is in the United States Soccer Hall of Fame.

Tab Ramos played for North Carolina State University during the 1980s. He played for the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team in 1988 at the Summer Olympics and continued to play for the National Team until 2000. He has been named U.S. Soccer Player of the Year (1990) and is in the United States Soccer Hall of Fame.

Nora Lynn Finch (left) and Kay Yow carrying United States Olympic Festival Torch through North Carolina State University campus, fall 1987.

Nora Lynn Finch (left) and Kay Yow carrying United States Olympic Festival Torch through North Carolina State University campus, fall 1987.

Coach Kay Yow, NC State Women’s Basketball coach from 1975-2009, carried the Olympic torch in the opening ceremony of the 1987 U.S. Olympic Festival in Raleigh.  She went on to coach the winning U.S. Women’s Basketball team in the 1988 Olympics. As a member of the Naismith Hall of Fame, Yow had more than 700 career wins.

Coach Kay Yow and the United States Olympic team show pride during the playing of the National Anthem before an exhibition game in Raleigh, 1988.

Coach Kay Yow and the United States Olympic team show pride during the playing of the National Anthem before an exhibition game in Raleigh, 1988.

Many more highlights of NC State athletics and Olympians over the years are available in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and in our collection guides. Check out our Historical State timelines for more NC State athletics history, and contact us if you are interested in using these or any other materials in the SCRC!

By: James Stewart

Annual reports and plans of work created by the Cooperative (Agricultural) Extension service document their completed tasks and goals to improve the agriculture and economy of North Carolina and its citizens. While primarily composed of text, they often contained a combination of media and information visuals designed to supplement the written information. Those supplements included pamphlets, extension circulars, newspaper clippings, radio scripts, and even blueprints.

Below are several examples of unique items digitized within these reports by the “Better Living” project.

Extension Circular No. 272 - Disease Control in the Home Garden, February 1944. From Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina for 1944

Extension circulars were publications on various agricultural technical topics printed on a few pages for easy use. Many more of these were digitized in the Green and Growing project.

Magazine “Business of Farming” Autumn 1956. From North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report for 1956

There are numerous articles and press releases within these reports from North Carolina newspapers and regional agricultural magazines. These articles were usually contributed by an extension service department agent.  The article from the “Business of Farming” magazine  (above) includes an interview with W. C. Warrick, an extension agricultural engineer and a farm couple from Alexander County, North Carolina, on the development of the best type of home for a modern (1950s) farm family.

Brochure for 1966 N. C. Farm Materials Handling Exposition - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1966.

Several brochures and flyers are important records of the educational outreach of extension agents and professors.

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Many reports from the Biological and Agricultural Engineering extension office contain oversized blueprints of modern farming facilities and data charts which had to be carefully unfolded so a resource could be digitized using our overhead scanner.

Architectural Drawing - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1965

Technical drawings from within the annual reports reveal the intricate planning of agricultural research stations and facilities in North Carolina.

Photos - Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina For 1944

Many photographs of extension activities were printed within the text of some annual reports. In some cases original photographs were affixed to report pages as documentation of extension activities.

Resources related to all agricultural sciences taught by the Cooperative Extension are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. Additionally, Historic State is rich resource for discovering information about the university’s role in creating educational materials about agriculture in North Carolina.

Jul 28 2016

Going, Going, Gone

By: Brian Dietz

What goes up must come down. Harrelson Hall wasn’t exactly the most beloved of campus buildings, but in early depictions you can see the excitement that went with its construction and opening.

Well, there was a fair amount of excitement this summer, too, as we watched its demolition, as captured here in Ed Funkhouser’s photographs.

Demolition of Harrelson Hall

Demolition of Harrelson Hall

Demolition of Harrelson Hall

Demolition of Harrelson Hall

Honestly, I’m sad to see it go. The good news is that, from south of the brickyard, we now have an unimpeded view of D. H. Hill Library!

Resources related to Harrelson Hall’s demolition and other campus buildings are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. Additionally, our Historical State Campus Buildings & Grounds Timeline is a rich resource for information about the ever-evolving face of our beautiful campus.

By: Virginia Ferris

The demolition of Harrelson Hall, the first cylindrical building to ever be built on a university campus, has been a topic of conversation this summer, stirring up a mix of emotions among students, alumni, and faculty who remember the building.

In the coming weeks, we will bring you a series of posts highlighting the life of one of the most provocative buildings on campus.  For now, enjoy the images of Harrelson below and explore our digitized collections and follow us on Twitter for more!  And as always, contact us if you have questions or are interested in using these items or any other materials in the Special Collections Research Center.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Postcard of Harrelson Hall, 1962.

Harrelson Hall under construction, circa 1960.

Harrelson Hall under construction, circa 1960.

Hallway in Harrelson Hall during construction, circa 1960.

Hallway in Harrelson Hall during construction, circa 1960.

Aerial view of University Plaza, Harrelson Hall, and surrounding buildings, 1967.

Aerial view of University Plaza, Harrelson Hall, and surrounding buildings, 1967.

A classroom in Harrelson Hall.

A classroom in Harrelson Hall.

Interior view of ramp around core of Harrelson Hall.

Interior view of ramp around core of Harrelson Hall.

Student in Harrelson Hall ramp.

Student in Harrelson Hall ramp.

By: Laura Abraham

We here at NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Research Center want to help you beat the heat with these images taken of kids at 4-H summer camps. Our Rare and Unique Digital Collections has a great amount of materials related to the history and activities of the NC Cooperative Extension, an organization which includes the Department of 4-H Youth Development. The images below were taken at North Carolina summer camps established through the Cooperative Extension, where 4-H children could find education and recreation during their vacation months.

You can find more images related to 4-H camps here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

By: Virginia Ferris

NC State ice cream video created by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

NC State ice cream video created by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

July is National Ice Cream Month!  Click the image above to view a video from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Audiovisual Collection, showing a look behind the scenes of NC State’s campus creamery.  Howling Cow ice cream is still made and enjoyed on campus today (available in both D.H. Hill Library and James B. Hunt Jr. Library), especially during the dog days of summer.

Explore our digitized collections for more ice cream-related materials from the archives!

Guilford County 4-H Club girls selling ice cream to the picnic to send delegates to Short Course, August 1, 1941.

Guilford County 4-H Club girls selling ice cream to the picnic to send delegates to Short Course, August 1, 1941.

Patricia Simonds, Dairy Princess 1957, with cup of N.C. State College ice cream during Dairy Month

Patricia Simonds, Dairy Princess 1957, with cup of N.C. State College ice cream during Dairy Month

Boy and girl eating ice cream, 1956.

Boy and girl eating ice cream, 1956.