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Posts tagged: Agricultural Extension

Jun 06 2017

Behind the Scenes of “Better Living”

June is the final month of the “Better Living in North Carolina” LSTA-funded grant project. Over the past two years, NCSU Libraries and the F. D. Bluford Library at NC A&T have made thousands of cooperative extension materials available online for researchers to access. Large undertakings like this don’t just happen overnight; it takes a lot of work over a long period of time to put together a project of this magnitude. Here is a look behind the scenes at the people who helped to bring “Better Living” to life.

The "Better Living" team at the State Farmers Market

[From left to right]

Brian Dietz is the Digital Program Librarian for Special Collections at NCSU Libraries. Brian is one of the co-principal investigators of the project, and acts and the technical/production lead.

Iyanna Sims is the Head of Bibliographic, Metadata & Discovery Services at the Bluford Library, and worked as the computer technology expert for NC A&T.

James Stewart is the Head of Archives & Special Collections at the Bluford Library, where he is responsible for selecting the material to be included in the project as well as performing the quality control on and the sharing of digital content with NCSU Libraries. He has been in this role since January 2017; prior to this, he worked as the project coordinator at NCSU Libraries.

Christopher Hogendoorn is the Digital Project Librarian and current project coordinator at NCSU, where he oversees the day-to-day production and quality control of all “Better Living” material.

Todd Kosmerick is the NCSU University Archivist and co-principal investigator of the project, serving as the content lead responsible for selecting the material and leading outreach efforts for the grant.

Netta Cox is the Head of Serials/Government Documents Librarian at the Bluford Library, where she is the principal investigator for the project at NC A&T, managing the overall progress of the grant.

Not pictured is Gloria Pitts, the outgoing Head of Archives & Special Collections at the Bluford Library, who also selected material to be part of the project.

We would not have been able to do this project without the assistance of our dedicated students. At NCSU Libraries, Jacque Dinnes, Derek Huss, and Jeanette Shaffer scanned and created the metadata for thousands of “Better Living” items, while Jamare Byers, Brielle Cowan, Sherilynn Knight, and Amani Newman did the corresponding work at the Bluford Library.

The end of the project is approaching, but new “Better Living” material is being added all the time, and is available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. While you’re at it, check out the Historical State timeline on the Cooperative Extension Service.

May 08 2017

“Better Living” Grows with Influx of Microfilm

As the “‘Better Living’ in North Carolina” project enters its final months, Special Collections staff are working hard to make many cooperative extension materials available through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections website. Recent additions to “Better Living” include digitized microfilm reports from county and state-wide extension agents. These reports exist only in microfilm format, which is difficult to use. They reveal a staggering amount of detailed information about agricultural extension and home demonstration work in North Carolina at the individual county level. The reports currently online span the years 1908 – 1935. Depending on the year and the county, there could be reports from the agricultural extension agent and the home demonstration agent in the area, and these were often divided between those serving the white and African American populations, meaning four agents could write separate reports for a single county. Furthermore, each report could contain a statistical section and a narrative section, making for a lot of reports and a lot of data.

1927 African American Home Demonstration Annual Report, Wake County

Here is the African American home demonstration statistical report from Wake County for 1927. These reports were standardized forms which the extension agents completed with information gathered during the year. In this report, we see that Wake County had two agents, Bertha Maye and Lucy James. The report also tells us that they believed there were 50 communities throughout the county in which extension work should be carried out, but only 16 communities where it actually was. Was this a funding issue, or was there trouble getting people to participate? These reports reveal how many home visits these agents made (114 visits to 62 homes) and how many phone calls they placed over the year (61 in total). Maye and James primarily led their communities through food, nutrition, and clothing demonstrations. For example, the report says that 89 women and 72 girls received instruction on preparing better school lunches and that 161 girls’ coats were made. This granular detail fills in for the researcher overlooked aspects of life at this time, providing a more holistic view.

1918 Agricultural Agent Report, Cherokee County

1918 Agricultural Agent Annual Report, Cherokee County

The 1918 white narrative report from J. H. Hampton, extension agent for Cherokee County, is similarly revealing. The narrative reports flesh out the story that the numbers only partially tell. On dairy farming, for example, Hampton writes: “One cheese factory was established in the county on the cooperative plan. In March, 100 cows were promised to furnish milk for the factory. Owing to the delay in securing equipment for the factory we did not get it started until July 29 and there was not as much milk furnished as was promised. There will be one or more carloads of high grade Holstein cows brought into this community next spring. A pure bred Holstein bull has alread[y] arrived there.” The explanation that the narrative reports provide gives context to the numbers, and the two are necessary to understand the impact cooperative extension had in any given area.

1934 Extension Entomologist Annual Report

1934 Extension Entomologist Annual Report

On top of all of these county reports, the microfilm also has state-wide extension reports which cover the program’s focus areas, like swine production, plant pathology, and home management. Altogether there is a vast amount of material in these records which document life in the aggregate in early twentieth-century North Carolina. Preventing insect damage to crop production was the responsibility of the extension entomologist, and in 1934 that was C. H. Brannon. According to him, “1934 was a season of almost unprecedented horn worm infestation on tobacco, the damage was widespread and heavy. Farmers purchased a large number of small dusters for the application of poison and excellent results were secured by those who followed recommendations. Most tobacco growers are beginning to realize that insects must be controlled if tobacco is to be grown at a profit. The excellent price for the 1934 crop will make farmers more solicitous than ever of insect infestations of the 1935 crop and we are expecting even better cooperation in the future.” To find out if Brannon’s predictions were correct, you will have to explore the 1935 entomology report yourself.

"Better Living" Microfilm Reels 132-261

Half of the "Better Living" Microfilm Reels

So far, the 177,076 pages online represents 1/4 of the “Better Living” microfilm, so there’s a lot that will be available in the coming weeks. All of the digitized microfilm from the “Better Living” project is available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. While you’re at it, check out the Historical State timeline on the Cooperative Extension Service.

Mar 27 2017

Two Special Collections Exhibits in the D.H. Hill Library

If you have walked through the D.H. Hill Library’s Ask Us lobby any time over the past week, you may have noticed a glass display case and a large mobile monitor off in the southwest corner. These are the latest exhibits put together by the Special Collections Research Center, celebrating both Agricultural Awareness Week and Women’s History Month.

Special Collections Exhibits

Special Collections Exhibits

In the display case is a sampling of agricultural extension material from the 1910s to the 1960s, all recently digitized as part of the “Better Living in North Carolina” project. The items in this case range from a pamphlet instructing readers on how to grow and sell Christmas trees to a schematic detailing the construction of an automatic swine watering machine. There are even a few items explaining to North Carolina’s farmers that an increase in their produce and meat production could help win the Second World War. The “Better Living in North Carolina” project is collaboration between NCSU Libraries and the F.D. Bluford Library at North Carolina A&T State University. It seeks to make available online thousands of resources documenting the agricultural economy of North Carolina and its transformation throughout the twentieth century, spurred by the innovation and research of the Cooperative Extension Service.

North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report 1948

North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report 1948

Up on the monitor is a digital exhibit showcasing women in cooperative extension work. This material comes from the “Better Living in North Carolina” and “Green ‘N’ Growing” projects. We’ve put together a collection of photographs and pamphlet covers which depict the wide array of work that women have done as part of the cooperative extension initiatives, usually through home demonstrations. One of the photographs in the exhibit shows a woman leading a demonstration on the nutritional value of milk for children, and another depicts a home demonstration agent instructing people on financial management. There is also a pamphlet which gives instructions on how to properly streamline the dishwashing process to cure their “dishpanitis.”

Group of Women Attending a Home Demonstration Event

Group of Women Attending a Home Demonstration Event

All of these items and more can be seen in the Ask Us lobby of the D. H. Hill Library, so if you have not seen the exhibits yet, check them out today! The exhibits will be up through Sunday, 2 April. The content of these exhibits is available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. While you’re at it, check out the Historical State timeline on the Cooperative Extension Service.

Mar 22 2017

Image Discovery Week: Glass Negatives and Lantern Slides

This week, we’re joining the Harrye B. Lyon Design Library of the NCSU College of Design to celebrate Image Discovery Week by highlighting some of the unique visual resources offered through NCSU Libraries.  Check out the Design Library blog to view a sampling of the wonderful images they have to offer, which they’re sharing in a blog blitz all of this week.

Today we’re sharing some of the images from the University Archives Photograph Collection of glass plate negatives and lantern slides, showing scenes of farm life and landscapes around North Carolina (because it’s also Agricultural Awareness Week!).

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

This collection consists of glass negatives and lantern slides that were created by developing a photographic negative over a piece of light-sensitive lantern glass, and were then often hand-painted to give the image a rich, colorful finish. The slides were displayed using “Magic Lantern Slide” technology, lit up by lantern or candle light, and projected on a wall.

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

Much of the material in this collection was created by or received from the Agricultural Extension Service, and depicts various aspects of agriculture in North Carolina, including agricultural extension work, agricultural research, farms and farm life, animal husbandry, botany, horticulture, and crop science.

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

You can view more of the slides in this collection through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Mar 06 2017

4-H Publications in “Better Living in North Carolina”

Recently made available online as part of the “Better Living in North Carolina” collection, a collaborative project between NCSU Libraries and the F.D. Bluford Library at North Carolina A&T State University, are over 300 4-H Club publications dating from the 1930s through to the 1980s. These publications cover a wide array of topics and formats, from monthly newsletters highlighting the activities of the state 4-H office to leaflets and pamphlets instructing readers on how to iron their clothes, efficiently arrange their bedroom, or prepare their cattle to be exhibited at events like the National Dairy Show. The objective of the “Better Living” project is to make digitally accessible the annual reports and publications of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, the body that administers 4-H club work and is itself based at both NC State and NC A&T.  While this collection does not represent the entirety of 4-H club publications from this time period, it does show the wide array of areas of instruction that were offered to youth throughout the state. Prior to the internet, these publications may have been the only way young North Carolinians could get the latest information about topics that could improve their agricultural and domestic activities or learn when the annual 4-H summer camps were taking place. Here we have selected a few items which cover the different types of 4-H publications in our collection.

4-H News, vol. X, no. 1 - 1972-01-18

4-H News, vol. X, no. 1 - 1972-01-18

This newsletter from 1972 was used to keep 4-H club agents up-to-date on the latest news from the state’s head office, which they were then to disseminate to club leaders and members. This issue includes a reminder about a scholarship deadline, a request for slides to be used in a collage highlighting efforts to improve the environment, and the advertisement of a 4-H member summer exchange with Dubois County, Indiana.

Communicating 4-H, vol. 4, no. 4 - 1988-04

Communicating 4-H, vol. 4, no. 4 - 1988-04

In 1985, the Cooperative Extension Service (then known as the Agricultural Extension Service) rebooted its 4-H newsletter. The result of this was Communicating 4-H, which was similar in appearance and content to 4-H News. The target audience remained extension agents, but the newsletters were longer, opening with short essays from different individuals linked to 4-H and containing more news bulletins and advertisements, reflective of the organization’s expanded programming. This example from April 1988 offers a rumination on the importance of developing good citizenship traits, an advertisement for space camp, and a list of leaders recently certified as “Master Volunteers.”

4-Hward Special Camp Issue 1954

4-Hward Special Camp Issue 1954

4-Hward preceded both of these publications, beginning in the 1940s. While it did act as a newsletter for 4-H agents, it was primarily filled with programming content for their meetings, such as songs, poems, and exercises and activities. Each year, a special camp issue was published, which would guide counselors through the camp program, including the daily schedule, their responsibilities, and how meetings and ceremonies were to be conducted. This issue from 1954 even contains instructions on square dancing.

4-H Club Series 99 - 1962-09

4-H Club Series 99 - 1962-09

4-H Club Series 80 - 1961-09

4-H Club Series 80 - 1961-09

4-H Club Series 55 - 1947-03

4-H Club Series 55 - 1947-03

The 4-H Club Series began publication in the 1930s. Its purpose was to instruct 4-H youth on various aspects of agricultural and domestic life, and over its approximate 30 year history, covered myriad topics. The ones shown here, the “Fat Steer Manual,” “Tree Identification Manual,” and “Canning,” are a fraction of what is now available online.

These photos and lots more related to 4-H club publications are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. While you’re at it, check out the Historical State timeline on the Cooperative Extension Service. The history of 4-H in North Carolina was further documented as part of the SCRC’s “Green ‘N’ Growing” project, and can be found here. Finally, 4-H is still going strong in North Carolina. More details about their current programing and resources can be found on their website.

Dec 19 2016

From the Archives: Christmas Trees from our Digital Archives

The holidays are nearly upon us, and NC State students have finished their exams and preparing for winter break. We here at the Special Collections and Research Center at NCSU Libraries want to wish you Happy Holidays and show off the Rare and Unique Digital Collections, so here are videos, images, and documents featuring Christmas trees, an important plant industry in North Carolina. Let’s start off with two videos we have digitally preserved and uploaded to our site. Enjoy!

Christmas Plants

Click image to watch: "Christmas Plants": Caring for Live Christmas Trees

Christmas Trees

Click image to watch: "Christmas Trees": Interview with Hal Reynolds and Fred Whitfield

Here is a selection of digitized images from our archives. The Christmas trees shown here not only come from collections highlighting University history and its winters past, but also our focus on forestry, home demonstration, and agricultural extension.

Decorating the Christmas tree at the College Union, 1955
Decorating the Christmas tree at the College Union, 1955
Students decorating a Christmas tree
Students decorating a Christmas tree in the Student Union, 1961
YMCA Christmas
Christmas at the YMCA, 1950s
4-H club boys give a demonstration on Christmas trees

4-H club boys give a demonstration on Christmas trees, 1954

Home Demonstration women setting up Christmas decorations at Broughton Hospital

Home Demonstration women setting up Christmas decorations at Broughton Hospital, 1960's

Home Demonstration exhibit "Stitch In Time For Christmas"

Home Demonstration exhibit "Stitch In Time For Christmas" at NC State Fair, 1960

Colored lantern slide of "Christmas tree land"

Colored lantern slide of "Christmas tree land," as viewed from Roan Mountain, circa 1920s

County Agent J. C. Powell examining cedar plantings

Forestry extension agent examping cedar plantings, future Christmas trees, 1942

Christmas Tree Plantation in Mountains

Christmas tree farm in the mountains, 1973

Finally, here are two text documents, “Forestry manual and record book for 4-H club members” and “Pathways To A New Century: Summary Report 1987-1990.” Both discuss the importance of Christmas trees as an economical resource, one as a guide written for young 4-H club members, the other a progress report for NC Cooperative Extension Service workers.

Forestry manual and record book for 4-H club membersPathways To A New Century - Summary Report 1987-1990

Again, have a wonderful break! If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Nov 21 2016

New Items and Cross-Referencing Materials Within “Better Living”

Southern Farm Management Extension Publications, no. 5 - Inheritance Your Farm And Family

One goal of “Better Living in North Carolina” is to digitize the Cooperative Extension Service Annual Reports, print copies of which are held by NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center. A year into the project, nearly all of these reports have been digitized and are now available online. Project staff has shifted its focus to the publications of the Cooperative Extension, like 4-H newsletters, Home Economics bulletins, and even TV schedules for Extension programs.

Another purpose of “Better Living” is the digitization of hundreds of Cooperative Extension Annual Reports that exist only on microfilm. Right now, 467 reports from 1909 to 1917 digitized from four reels of microfilm are online. While icrofilm is still widely available at many libraries, it is an obsolete technology. Even when it is used, microfilm presents many limitations to copying and searching. Digitized microfilm images are by far easier to access and search.

Cover from a 1917 county agent report by John W. Mitchell. Digitized from microfilm.

These reports and publications are more than year by year documentation and products of the agricultural extension. They are also artifacts of the hard work of the men and women who developed the agricultural extension in its early history. The very first annual report (above) submitted by A&T agent John W. Mitchell, can now be seen. Some of the first club reports by Jane McKimmon are also online. It is now possible to research the first county agents of Mecklenburg, Chatham and Guilford Counties and then check for related information in other materials within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections“.

Photo of Campers Getting Ready to Start Camp Improvement Project. All 80 Photographs in "Better Living in NC" are from the S. B. Simmons Collection, Archives & Special Collections, North Carolina A&T State University.

The boon to today’s researchers is being able to quickly cross reference materials of multiple formats from the agricultural history of North Carolina. One can start with any item like an annual report, then narrow that search for a particular agent, county, region, or extension program, and also search for a conference brochure for names, related reports, and images within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections” and “Historical State“.  Agent John Mitchell is one of a few cases were biographical essays are also available. By focusing on these resources, “Better Living” complements the previous NCSU Libraries LSTA-funded digitization projects, “Cultivating A Revolution” and “Green and Growing.” The three work together to expose scores of resources documenting the impact of agricultural innovation in NC across the last century.

If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and text materials documenting extension history and other topics.

Sep 26 2016

From the Collections of John D. Wray and S. B. Simmons

Bio and Portrait of S. B. Simmons

Better Living In North Carolina is a collaborative digital project between the NCSU Libraries and the Bluford Library at North Carolina A&T State University that is designed to reveal how agricultural practices transformed the state of North Carolina over the course of the last century. This can not be done without also uncovering new revelations about the men and women who worked as part of the NC Cooperative Extension Service and our state’s vocational education programs. We are proud to announce the availability of resources from the collection of two very significant men from the Archives and Special Collections of NC A&T State University and the state’s vocational education history.

S. B. (Sidney Britton) Simmons (1894-1957) was the state supervisor of vocational agriculture for African-American schools in North Carolina for over 30 years beginning in 1924. He was a nationally recognized champion of vocational agriculture and a graduate and post graduate of multiple colleges, including A&T College and the University of Illinois.

Photo (New Farmers of America North Carolina young male group)

He was one of the founders of the National Association of New Farmers of America (NFA), a vocational agriculture organization for African American youth. Simmons brought this organization to the Tarheel State as the North Carolina Association of NFA. The NFA and the Future Farmers of America (FFA) would merge together in the mid-1960s. As state director and through the North Carolina NFA, Simmons impacted the education of thousands of African American youth via school programs, camps, conferences, broadcasts, and competitions. Highlights from the Simmons collection include several photographs of young African American men and women at various camps, demonstrations, and conferences learning different agricultural practices, from curing tobacco to herding livestock.

Photo of a Girl Curing Turkish Tobacco

View the S. B. Simmons Collection, Archives and Special Collections, F. D. Bluford Library, North Carolina A&T State University

John D. Wray (1877 – 1937) was the state’s first African-American club (later 4-H) agent, or “Negro Club Leader,” beginning in 1915. He organized the first agricultural clubs in counties that up to that time did not have African American extension agents. The first clubs for homemakers, crop rotation, peanuts, and cotton were started during his 10 years as an extension agent. His office was located on the campus of NC A&T.

"Negro boys and girls attend short course at A and T College", article by John D. Wray. Wray contributed numerous farming articles to regional and national newspapers.

Like Simmons, Wray also previously worked for the Tuskegee Institute before coming to North Carolina. His writings of proper farming techniques were circulated to state and national newspapers. Like Neil Alexander Bailey, the state’s first African American extension agent, Wray specialized in the research of corn production, and his thesis on this topic is now available online. He later became an instructor of vocational agriculture at the Laurinburg Institute, and a professor at Florida A&M University.

View the John. D. Wray Collection, Archives and Special Collections, F. D. Bluford Library, North Carolina A&T State University

More on the life and work of John D. Wray can be found at John D. Wray and the Fight for Black Farmers – NC EATS.

The resources currently available in the Better Living collection continue to grow, and there will be many more to come on the life of John D. Wray, S. B. Simmons. and others who helped to advance the agricultural practices of North Carolina.

If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and text materials documenting extension history and other topics.

Aug 02 2016

Hidden Documents Within The Cooperative Extension Service Annual Reports

Annual reports and plans of work created by the Cooperative (Agricultural) Extension service document their completed tasks and goals to improve the agriculture and economy of North Carolina and its citizens. While primarily composed of text, they often contained a combination of media and information visuals designed to supplement the written information. Those supplements included pamphlets, extension circulars, newspaper clippings, radio scripts, and even blueprints.

Below are several examples of unique items digitized within these reports by the “Better Living” project.

Extension Circular No. 272 - Disease Control in the Home Garden, February 1944. From Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina for 1944

Extension circulars were publications on various agricultural technical topics printed on a few pages for easy use. Many more of these were digitized in the Green and Growing project.

Magazine “Business of Farming” Autumn 1956. From North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report for 1956

There are numerous articles and press releases within these reports from North Carolina newspapers and regional agricultural magazines. These articles were usually contributed by an extension service department agent.  The article from the “Business of Farming” magazine  (above) includes an interview with W. C. Warrick, an extension agricultural engineer and a farm couple from Alexander County, North Carolina, on the development of the best type of home for a modern (1950s) farm family.

Brochure for 1966 N. C. Farm Materials Handling Exposition - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1966.

Several brochures and flyers are important records of the educational outreach of extension agents and professors.

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Many reports from the Biological and Agricultural Engineering extension office contain oversized blueprints of modern farming facilities and data charts which had to be carefully unfolded so a resource could be digitized using our overhead scanner.

Architectural Drawing - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1965

Technical drawings from within the annual reports reveal the intricate planning of agricultural research stations and facilities in North Carolina.

Photos - Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina For 1944

Many photographs of extension activities were printed within the text of some annual reports. In some cases original photographs were affixed to report pages as documentation of extension activities.

Resources related to all agricultural sciences taught by the Cooperative Extension are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. Additionally, Historic State is rich resource for discovering information about the university’s role in creating educational materials about agriculture in North Carolina.

Jul 15 2016

From the Archives: Summer Fun at 4-H Camps

We here at NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Research Center want to help you beat the heat with these images taken of kids at 4-H summer camps. Our Rare and Unique Digital Collections has a great amount of materials related to the history and activities of the NC Cooperative Extension, an organization which includes the Department of 4-H Youth Development. The images below were taken at North Carolina summer camps established through the Cooperative Extension, where 4-H children could find education and recreation during their vacation months.

You can find more images related to 4-H camps here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.