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Posts tagged: Collection Highlights

May 17 2017

Celebrating the Class of 1967 and the Forever Club

Last week, members of the NC State University graduating class of 1967 joined the Alumni Association’s Forever Club, a community of alumni who graduated from NC State 50 years ago and earlier. Special Collections joined the celebration for a third year in a row, bringing a show and tell of items from the archives that reflected their time as students at NC State.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

The class of 1967 would have taken classes in the newly constructed Harrelson Hall, spent time in the Erdahl-Cloyd Student Union (currently housing the Atrium and West Wing of D.H. Hill Library), witnessed the Pullen Hall fire of 1965, welcomed growing numbers of female students living in the first female dorm on campus in Watauga Hall, celebrated the first football game in the new Carter-Finley Stadium, honored legendary basketball coach Everett Case and welcomed new coach Norman Sloan, and much more.

Alumni gathered at the Park Alumni Center to kick off their reunion weekend, and spent time exploring Agromeck yearbooks, issues of the 1964-1965 Technician from their freshman year, admissions booklets for prospective students noting the price of tuition in 1964 ($162.50 per semester for in-state students), athletics programs, brochures and calendars of events in the student union, photographs, computer punch cards from the first Computing Center on campus, and more.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni shared some of their memories of the events reflected in the materials on display, and several sat down to record these stories in Wolf Tales recordings that will add more nuance to the record of this period on campus. One alumnus described watching the news of the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, and being sent home early for Thanksgiving that year. Another alumnus spoke about the excitement and challenges of using a large, shared computer in the Computing Center to complete his course work as an Electrical Engineering student.

As part of our work to document and share the history of NC State, especially from the student perspective, we look forward to collecting stories and bringing materials from the archives into the hands of alumni and other members of the NC State community. You can explore more university history through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Mar 22 2017

Image Discovery Week: Glass Negatives and Lantern Slides

This week, we’re joining the Harrye B. Lyon Design Library of the NCSU College of Design to celebrate Image Discovery Week by highlighting some of the unique visual resources offered through NCSU Libraries.  Check out the Design Library blog to view a sampling of the wonderful images they have to offer, which they’re sharing in a blog blitz all of this week.

Today we’re sharing some of the images from the University Archives Photograph Collection of glass plate negatives and lantern slides, showing scenes of farm life and landscapes around North Carolina (because it’s also Agricultural Awareness Week!).

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

This collection consists of glass negatives and lantern slides that were created by developing a photographic negative over a piece of light-sensitive lantern glass, and were then often hand-painted to give the image a rich, colorful finish. The slides were displayed using “Magic Lantern Slide” technology, lit up by lantern or candle light, and projected on a wall.

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

Much of the material in this collection was created by or received from the Agricultural Extension Service, and depicts various aspects of agriculture in North Carolina, including agricultural extension work, agricultural research, farms and farm life, animal husbandry, botany, horticulture, and crop science.

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

You can view more of the slides in this collection through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Jan 10 2017

Special Collections Display in Veterinary Medicine Library

Currently on display in the William Rand Kenan Jr. Library of Veterinary Medicine is a selection of items highlighting the history of the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine, a legacy preserved and shared by the Special Collections Research Center. The display features materials that tell the story of the evolution of the College of Veterinary Medicine, focusing especially on the administrators, faculty, and students at the heart of that story. Below is a preview of the items on display – visit the Veterinary Medicine Library to see more!

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

The two original barns were built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s. The site became the University Dairy Farm for NC State in 1940, before becoming part of the original campus of the School of Veterinary Medicine (later re-named the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1987).  Photographs located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420).

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

A biography of founding dean Terrence Curtin, in the 1984 “Fact Book” for School of Veterinary Medicine, is located in the NCSU Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity Records (UA 005.009).

Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

The NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association (SCAVMA) was founded in 1981, by the first class of students enrolled in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Image above is found in the Vet Med 1984 yearbook, “VetCetera,” located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Publications (UA 145.200).

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

The College of Veterinary Medicine installed a whale skeleton in its main building in 1988, after collecting the skeleton from the Outer Banks in 1986 through the work of faculty members J.W. Doyle, Ed Smallwood, and Paul Nader, as well as Vet Med student and faculty volunteers and the National Guard. The above photographs are located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420). More information on the skeleton discovery and installation can be found in the Technician article below.

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

These items and more will be on display in the Vet Med Library through the spring 2017 semester.

You can learn more about the history of the College of Veterinary Medicine through its Historical State timeline, and in other collection materials in the SCRC, including digitized photographs, documents, folders, and a written history by founding dean Terrence M. Curtin. If you have questions about the display or about these or other items in the SCRC, please contact us!

https://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f%5Bformat%5D%5B%5D=Text&q=veterinary+medicine

Jan 03 2017

Happy New Year from Special Collections

To help ring in the new year, we’re highlighting several issues of the Technician newspaper, featuring New Year’s wishes for NC State students from the student newspaper’s earliest years.

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The above issue from Jan. 4, 1924, included New Year greetings to students from Eugene Clyde Brooks, president of NC State from 1923-1934, encouraging the “young men” of State College (two years before the first women graduated with degrees from NC State) “who seek a new freedom on a higher moral and intellectual plane during the year 1924″ – and to avoid the “many opportunities” to indulge “low and base conduct.”

Below, a Jan. 1, 1922 issue celebrated a basketball victory over the holiday break and gave similar words of encouragement – especially urging the students to work “with and not against Student Government,” and help State College, as NC State was known at the time, continue to grow in positive ways.

he Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

The Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

You can browse these and many more issues online through our digitized Technician archive. Looking at first January issues of the year of the Technician over the years, the newspaper has reported on some common occurrences that are still relevant today as we prepare to start back into a new semester – basketball victories, the inaugurations of new governors, and students returning to campus and registering for classes, through rain, snow, and ice at times.

If you are interested in learning more about the digitized Technician online, or any other resources in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and collection guides, please feel free to contact us.  We hope that this new year brings the very best to all of our students, faculty and researchers!

Dec 07 2016

Remembering Pearl Harbor

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.  This event touched the lives of all Americans, including students here at NC State at the time.

In an oral history interview with William C. Friday, Friday describes his memories of first hearing about the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was a student at NC State (known at the time as State College), and its impact on his life. William Friday graduated from State College in 1941 with a degree in Textile Manufacturing, and went on to serve as President of the University of North Carolina system from 1956-1986.

Oral history with William C. Friday

Oral history with William C. Friday

Friday’s oral history can be heard as part of the Student Leadership Initiative, along with many other interviews with former student leaders over the years.

The Technician newspaper includes other evidence of the impact of Pearl Harbor on students at NC State.  According to the student newspaper on Feb. 7, 1942, NC State student Robert Westbrook was killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor.  Westbrook, a Raleigh native, was a radio operator in a bomber.

Clipping from Feb. 1942 Technician, acknowledging the death of student Robert Westbrook in Pearl Harbor.

Clipping from Feb. 1942 Technician, acknowledging the death of student Robert Westbrook in Pearl Harbor.

Almost one year after the attack, on Dec. 4, 1942, the Technician describes a “quiet observance” planned to take place at the Memorial Bell Tower, honoring “those alumni killed at Pearl Harbor or in other war action.” As part of the ceremony, ROTC units marched to the Bell Tower and played taps, one moment of silence was observed, and no speeches were made.

Clipping from Dec. 4, 1942, Technician describing Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony.

Clipping from Dec. 4, 1942, Technician describing Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony.

More student reactions to Pearl Harbor and other military events over the years can be found in digitized issues of the Technician, available through our Rare & Unique Digital Collections.  If you are interested in exploring or learning more about these or other collections in the Special Collections Research Center, please contact us.

Dec 05 2016

Who would have thought comic books could be a part of Special Collections?

Comic books are an important part of pop culture, and with so many movie adaptations being released, they are now more than ever. Some comics can be regarded for their aesthetic and literary value, as they are diverse medium in genre and artistic style. Comics certainly can be considered archival material, and now they are a part of NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center. The Douglas Ward American Comic Books Collection has been processed by the SCRC, so its contents are now open to be viewed and researched, and its collection guide can be found online.

The collection was donated by Mr. Douglas Ward, a resident of Wake County and an information technology administrator, and his gift encompasses a selection of 2,057 comic books, published between 1975 and 1999, as well as a set of trading cards and art pieces.

Popular series: Wonder Woman, Star Wars: X-Wing--The Rogue Squadron, Black Panther, Doctor Strange

The comics are from various comic book publishers, chiefly of the “Big Two,” Marvel and DC Comics, in addition to Dark Horse, Image, and other publishers and independent presses. These materials are chiefly superhero comics, but also present are dramatic works, science fiction and fantasy titles, horror comics, comedic series, literary adaptations, crime books, anthologies, movie and television tie-ins, and counterculture “alternative” comics.

A wide variety of art styles and subjects: Martha Washington Goes to War, Astro City, Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, Harlan Ellison's Dream Corridor, Sin City, The Maxx, Groo

The art styles vary from: the “pop” design typical in mainstream comics; abstract works; ones inspired by classic comic strip and cartoons; highly detailed, fantasy-themed art; ones inspired by classic illustrations; and minimalist line-drawings. Some comics’ covers were designed to be eye-catching and may be holographic, iridescent, embossed, textured, or foil.

Show-and-Tell display at screening of the documentary She Makes Comics

You can browse the collection’s comics and items in its online finding aid, and if you are interested in viewing any, you can request them via this form.

If you would like to read more SCRC postings about the Ward Collection, please visit Processing Comics at Special Collections and Collection Highlights on Display at ‘Focus on Comics’ Event Series. To discover more information on Special Collections’ archival collections, please visit our Collections Guides, or browse through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections.

Nov 28 2016

Communication Services Images Added to University Archives

Wear Red Get Fed Homecoming event in 2004

Thanks to a recent addition, researchers can now access photographic negatives and digital images of NC State history from 1985 to 2011.  The 44 linear feet of materials expands the scope of the North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Communication Services Records; in its totality, the collection now provides a photographic archive of NCSU history from the 1940s to the 2010s.

The Department of Communication Services (previously the Department of Visual Aids) provided communication leadership and innovation for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to further the mission of North Carolina State University. It maintained a collection of negatives in chronological order based on faculty and staff requests.  In 2002, reflecting a switch to digital, the images are stored on CD-ROM rather than as photographic negatives.   By 2013, Communication Services was no longer a department under the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It merged with Creative Services to become one of the three units under University Communications. The other units are News Services and Web Communications.

Some negatives that were previously acquired have already been digitized and made available on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site.  Their subjects include portraits of faculty, staff, and students, athletics, agriculture (including livestock, crops, and farm life), and Cooperative Extension activities (especially 4-H).  This latest accession contains images of campus building groundbreakings, campus events, award ceremonies, and faculty research.  Up until now, the University Archives has not had many images from this more recent time period (1980s-2010s) because it frequently takes time for records to make their way to us.  Therefore this valuable addition fills in an essential part of the visual narrative of the University.

While much of the collection has not yet been digitized, researchers are welcome to view any materials, including negatives and digital files.  Indexes do exist for locating images by topic or department.  Please contact the Special Collections Research Center for more information or to view the collection.

Chancellor Marye Anne Fox breaks ground on the David Clark Lab expansion, October 2003

College of Design student, hard at work in 2005

CALS Tailgate in Dorton Arena, 2003

Nov 21 2016

New Items and Cross-Referencing Materials Within “Better Living”

Southern Farm Management Extension Publications, no. 5 - Inheritance Your Farm And Family

One goal of “Better Living in North Carolina” is to digitize the Cooperative Extension Service Annual Reports, print copies of which are held by NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center. A year into the project, nearly all of these reports have been digitized and are now available online. Project staff has shifted its focus to the publications of the Cooperative Extension, like 4-H newsletters, Home Economics bulletins, and even TV schedules for Extension programs.

Another purpose of “Better Living” is the digitization of hundreds of Cooperative Extension Annual Reports that exist only on microfilm. Right now, 467 reports from 1909 to 1917 digitized from four reels of microfilm are online. While icrofilm is still widely available at many libraries, it is an obsolete technology. Even when it is used, microfilm presents many limitations to copying and searching. Digitized microfilm images are by far easier to access and search.

Cover from a 1917 county agent report by John W. Mitchell. Digitized from microfilm.

These reports and publications are more than year by year documentation and products of the agricultural extension. They are also artifacts of the hard work of the men and women who developed the agricultural extension in its early history. The very first annual report (above) submitted by A&T agent John W. Mitchell, can now be seen. Some of the first club reports by Jane McKimmon are also online. It is now possible to research the first county agents of Mecklenburg, Chatham and Guilford Counties and then check for related information in other materials within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections“.

Photo of Campers Getting Ready to Start Camp Improvement Project. All 80 Photographs in "Better Living in NC" are from the S. B. Simmons Collection, Archives & Special Collections, North Carolina A&T State University.

The boon to today’s researchers is being able to quickly cross reference materials of multiple formats from the agricultural history of North Carolina. One can start with any item like an annual report, then narrow that search for a particular agent, county, region, or extension program, and also search for a conference brochure for names, related reports, and images within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections” and “Historical State“.  Agent John Mitchell is one of a few cases were biographical essays are also available. By focusing on these resources, “Better Living” complements the previous NCSU Libraries LSTA-funded digitization projects, “Cultivating A Revolution” and “Green and Growing.” The three work together to expose scores of resources documenting the impact of agricultural innovation in NC across the last century.

If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and text materials documenting extension history and other topics.

Nov 07 2016

Collection Highlights on Display at ‘Focus on Comics’ Event Series

The NCSU Libraries’ Focus on Comics Event Series has highlighted the cultural and academic importance of comic books, both emerging and historical. At two of the series’ events, the screening of the documentary She Makes Comics and Dr. Maggie Simon’s discussion Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature, the Special Collection Research Center showed off highlights of our collections related to comic books, graphic novels, and books as art objects. The featured items were selected because of their connections to comic book history and cultural context, women in comics as creators and characters, and unique approaches to graphic media.

Display at She Makes Comics screening

Display of comics at Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature discussion

Display at Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature discussion: Graphic novel God's Man: A Novel in Woodcuts, and comic collection The Pogo Party

Display of books as art objects at Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature discussion

Display of comics at Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature discussion

Display at Comics and Graphic Novels: The New Literature discussion: Book as art object Aunt Sallie's Lament, and The Wizard of Oz pop-up book

Display at She Makes Comics screening

Display at She Makes Comics screening

The displays included highlights from the Douglas Ward American Comic Books Collection, the Scott Green Collection of Comics-Related Publications, rare books such as Lynd Ward’s wordless novel God’s Man, Thomas Ockerse’s A-Z Book, and Claire Van Vliet’s Aunt Sallie’s Lament, and highlights from our collection of pop-up books. 

If you are interested in using these or any other Special Collections materials, or would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center, please contact us!

Oct 26 2016

New Dorton Arena construction photographs acquired and digitized in Special Collections

Dorton Arena Construction

Mies van der Rohe and others at the construction site of Dorton Arena

Thanks to a recent donation from Fayetteville architect and NC State graduate Dan MacMillan, Special Collections now has 73 new photographs of the Dorton Arena that were taken during its construction, circa 1951. During the time in which these photographs were taken, Dan MacMillan worked as a project engineer for Muirhead Construction on Raleigh’s Dorton Arena. The photographs that he donated include snapshots of famous visitors to the construction site such as Mies van der Rohe. Also included are photographs of some of the laborers who worked on the site.

Dorton Arena Construction

Dorton Arena workmen atop riveted scaffolding

These materials are all a part of a new collection donated by Dan MacMillan, the MacMillan and MacMillan Architectural Papers. They include original drawings of important modernist architectural projects in Fayetteville.

Dan MacMillan and his brother, Frank MacMillan, founded Dan MacMillan Architect and Associates in Fayetteville in 1952. They renamed the firm MacMillan and MacMillan after Frank received his license. They were joined for several years by Mason Hicks (MacMillan, Hicks, and MacMillan) before Hicks left in 1960 to found his own firm. From 1968-1970, the MacMillans joined with Shawcroft and Thames to form MacMillan, MacMillan, Shawcroft and Thames. After the foursome split, Dan and Frank continued as a duo until Frank’s death in 1991. At this time, Dan MacMillan sold the business to George Ellinwood. He worked for a few more years before retiring and returning to Fayetteville.

Dorton Arena Construction

Dorton Arena's steel latticework during its construction

MacMillan collaborated in several instances with landscape architect Richard C. “Dick” Bell. Among their most well-known collaborations were the Charles E. Kistler-Dell Hollstein House in Fayetteville, NC, which was destroyed in 2005, and the William S. and Mary Jane Ward Residence, a U-shaped home in Raleigh, NC, built on 3.4 acres over a stream.

For more information about Special Collections, please contact us here.