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Posts tagged: digital collections

Mar 22 2017

Image Discovery Week: Glass Negatives and Lantern Slides

This week, we’re joining the Harrye B. Lyon Design Library of the NCSU College of Design to celebrate Image Discovery Week by highlighting some of the unique visual resources offered through NCSU Libraries.  Check out the Design Library blog to view a sampling of the wonderful images they have to offer, which they’re sharing in a blog blitz all of this week.

Today we’re sharing some of the images from the University Archives Photograph Collection of glass plate negatives and lantern slides, showing scenes of farm life and landscapes around North Carolina (because it’s also Agricultural Awareness Week!).

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

"Two people standing in a tobacco field"

This collection consists of glass negatives and lantern slides that were created by developing a photographic negative over a piece of light-sensitive lantern glass, and were then often hand-painted to give the image a rich, colorful finish. The slides were displayed using “Magic Lantern Slide” technology, lit up by lantern or candle light, and projected on a wall.

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

"Children in front of strip farming fields"

Much of the material in this collection was created by or received from the Agricultural Extension Service, and depicts various aspects of agriculture in North Carolina, including agricultural extension work, agricultural research, farms and farm life, animal husbandry, botany, horticulture, and crop science.

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"Barn, fields and a row of flowers with mountains in the background"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"African American Home Demonstration Club at Thompson's Roadside Market"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Man with flowers in field in the mountains"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

"Harvesting Lespedeza hay with mule-drawn agricultural equipment"

You can view more of the slides in this collection through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Mar 06 2017

4-H Publications in “Better Living in North Carolina”

Recently made available online as part of the “Better Living in North Carolina” collection, a collaborative project between NCSU Libraries and the F.D. Bluford Library at North Carolina A&T State University, are over 300 4-H Club publications dating from the 1930s through to the 1980s. These publications cover a wide array of topics and formats, from monthly newsletters highlighting the activities of the state 4-H office to leaflets and pamphlets instructing readers on how to iron their clothes, efficiently arrange their bedroom, or prepare their cattle to be exhibited at events like the National Dairy Show. The objective of the “Better Living” project is to make digitally accessible the annual reports and publications of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, the body that administers 4-H club work and is itself based at both NC State and NC A&T.  While this collection does not represent the entirety of 4-H club publications from this time period, it does show the wide array of areas of instruction that were offered to youth throughout the state. Prior to the internet, these publications may have been the only way young North Carolinians could get the latest information about topics that could improve their agricultural and domestic activities or learn when the annual 4-H summer camps were taking place. Here we have selected a few items which cover the different types of 4-H publications in our collection.

4-H News, vol. X, no. 1 - 1972-01-18

4-H News, vol. X, no. 1 - 1972-01-18

This newsletter from 1972 was used to keep 4-H club agents up-to-date on the latest news from the state’s head office, which they were then to disseminate to club leaders and members. This issue includes a reminder about a scholarship deadline, a request for slides to be used in a collage highlighting efforts to improve the environment, and the advertisement of a 4-H member summer exchange with Dubois County, Indiana.

Communicating 4-H, vol. 4, no. 4 - 1988-04

Communicating 4-H, vol. 4, no. 4 - 1988-04

In 1985, the Cooperative Extension Service (then known as the Agricultural Extension Service) rebooted its 4-H newsletter. The result of this was Communicating 4-H, which was similar in appearance and content to 4-H News. The target audience remained extension agents, but the newsletters were longer, opening with short essays from different individuals linked to 4-H and containing more news bulletins and advertisements, reflective of the organization’s expanded programming. This example from April 1988 offers a rumination on the importance of developing good citizenship traits, an advertisement for space camp, and a list of leaders recently certified as “Master Volunteers.”

4-Hward Special Camp Issue 1954

4-Hward Special Camp Issue 1954

4-Hward preceded both of these publications, beginning in the 1940s. While it did act as a newsletter for 4-H agents, it was primarily filled with programming content for their meetings, such as songs, poems, and exercises and activities. Each year, a special camp issue was published, which would guide counselors through the camp program, including the daily schedule, their responsibilities, and how meetings and ceremonies were to be conducted. This issue from 1954 even contains instructions on square dancing.

4-H Club Series 99 - 1962-09

4-H Club Series 99 - 1962-09

4-H Club Series 80 - 1961-09

4-H Club Series 80 - 1961-09

4-H Club Series 55 - 1947-03

4-H Club Series 55 - 1947-03

The 4-H Club Series began publication in the 1930s. Its purpose was to instruct 4-H youth on various aspects of agricultural and domestic life, and over its approximate 30 year history, covered myriad topics. The ones shown here, the “Fat Steer Manual,” “Tree Identification Manual,” and “Canning,” are a fraction of what is now available online.

These photos and lots more related to 4-H club publications are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. While you’re at it, check out the Historical State timeline on the Cooperative Extension Service. The history of 4-H in North Carolina was further documented as part of the SCRC’s “Green ‘N’ Growing” project, and can be found here. Finally, 4-H is still going strong in North Carolina. More details about their current programing and resources can be found on their website.

Jan 23 2017

Wolf Tales Receives 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant

We’re happy to announce that the SCRC’s mobile oral history program, Wolf Tales, has received a 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant from the NCSU Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity (OIED). As described in this announcement from NCSU Libraries, the grant will support focused outreach to campus groups to document the voices of historically underrepresented students at NC State.

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

In its first year Wolf Tales has captured 41 recordings with a diverse range of voices, from current students to alumni of the class of 1943. The Wolf Tales video recordings and transcripts are archived and shared online through the Libraries’ Rare & Unique Digital Collections site. The Libraries has brought Wolf Tales recording stations to events ranging from annual reunions of the NCSU Alumni Association to “open days” in the Libraries where participants are invited to sit down individually or in groups of 2-3 people to make a 10-20 minute recording.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Having partnered with the African American Cultural Center to record student and alumni voices at Harambee! 2016, Wolf Tales will work with other campus organizations that support current and former students whose experiences have not been fully represented in written documentation, including in African American, LGBT, military veteran, Muslim, Latinx, and Native American communities.

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Plans are currently underway to bring Wolf Tales to the GLBT Center’s Lavender Graduation in April 2017 to gather stories of the experiences of GLBT students and their allies. Wolf Tales plans to extend this framework to other underrepresented voices through partnerships with other OIED units and student groups to create a more diverse, inclusive record and to prevent future silences in the archives.

If you’re interested in making a recording or discussing a possible partnership with Wolf Tales, please contact library_wolftales@ncsu.edu, and visit the Wolf Tales website for more information. We are actively seeking partners and would love to hear from you!

Jan 03 2017

Happy New Year from Special Collections

To help ring in the new year, we’re highlighting several issues of the Technician newspaper, featuring New Year’s wishes for NC State students from the student newspaper’s earliest years.

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The above issue from Jan. 4, 1924, included New Year greetings to students from Eugene Clyde Brooks, president of NC State from 1923-1934, encouraging the “young men” of State College (two years before the first women graduated with degrees from NC State) “who seek a new freedom on a higher moral and intellectual plane during the year 1924″ – and to avoid the “many opportunities” to indulge “low and base conduct.”

Below, a Jan. 1, 1922 issue celebrated a basketball victory over the holiday break and gave similar words of encouragement – especially urging the students to work “with and not against Student Government,” and help State College, as NC State was known at the time, continue to grow in positive ways.

he Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

The Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

You can browse these and many more issues online through our digitized Technician archive. Looking at first January issues of the year of the Technician over the years, the newspaper has reported on some common occurrences that are still relevant today as we prepare to start back into a new semester – basketball victories, the inaugurations of new governors, and students returning to campus and registering for classes, through rain, snow, and ice at times.

If you are interested in learning more about the digitized Technician online, or any other resources in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and collection guides, please feel free to contact us.  We hope that this new year brings the very best to all of our students, faculty and researchers!

Nov 28 2016

Communication Services Images Added to University Archives

Wear Red Get Fed Homecoming event in 2004

Thanks to a recent addition, researchers can now access photographic negatives and digital images of NC State history from 1985 to 2011.  The 44 linear feet of materials expands the scope of the North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Communication Services Records; in its totality, the collection now provides a photographic archive of NCSU history from the 1940s to the 2010s.

The Department of Communication Services (previously the Department of Visual Aids) provided communication leadership and innovation for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to further the mission of North Carolina State University. It maintained a collection of negatives in chronological order based on faculty and staff requests.  In 2002, reflecting a switch to digital, the images are stored on CD-ROM rather than as photographic negatives.   By 2013, Communication Services was no longer a department under the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It merged with Creative Services to become one of the three units under University Communications. The other units are News Services and Web Communications.

Some negatives that were previously acquired have already been digitized and made available on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site.  Their subjects include portraits of faculty, staff, and students, athletics, agriculture (including livestock, crops, and farm life), and Cooperative Extension activities (especially 4-H).  This latest accession contains images of campus building groundbreakings, campus events, award ceremonies, and faculty research.  Up until now, the University Archives has not had many images from this more recent time period (1980s-2010s) because it frequently takes time for records to make their way to us.  Therefore this valuable addition fills in an essential part of the visual narrative of the University.

While much of the collection has not yet been digitized, researchers are welcome to view any materials, including negatives and digital files.  Indexes do exist for locating images by topic or department.  Please contact the Special Collections Research Center for more information or to view the collection.

Chancellor Marye Anne Fox breaks ground on the David Clark Lab expansion, October 2003

College of Design student, hard at work in 2005

CALS Tailgate in Dorton Arena, 2003

Nov 21 2016

New Items and Cross-Referencing Materials Within “Better Living”

Southern Farm Management Extension Publications, no. 5 - Inheritance Your Farm And Family

One goal of “Better Living in North Carolina” is to digitize the Cooperative Extension Service Annual Reports, print copies of which are held by NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center. A year into the project, nearly all of these reports have been digitized and are now available online. Project staff has shifted its focus to the publications of the Cooperative Extension, like 4-H newsletters, Home Economics bulletins, and even TV schedules for Extension programs.

Another purpose of “Better Living” is the digitization of hundreds of Cooperative Extension Annual Reports that exist only on microfilm. Right now, 467 reports from 1909 to 1917 digitized from four reels of microfilm are online. While icrofilm is still widely available at many libraries, it is an obsolete technology. Even when it is used, microfilm presents many limitations to copying and searching. Digitized microfilm images are by far easier to access and search.

Cover from a 1917 county agent report by John W. Mitchell. Digitized from microfilm.

These reports and publications are more than year by year documentation and products of the agricultural extension. They are also artifacts of the hard work of the men and women who developed the agricultural extension in its early history. The very first annual report (above) submitted by A&T agent John W. Mitchell, can now be seen. Some of the first club reports by Jane McKimmon are also online. It is now possible to research the first county agents of Mecklenburg, Chatham and Guilford Counties and then check for related information in other materials within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections“.

Photo of Campers Getting Ready to Start Camp Improvement Project. All 80 Photographs in "Better Living in NC" are from the S. B. Simmons Collection, Archives & Special Collections, North Carolina A&T State University.

The boon to today’s researchers is being able to quickly cross reference materials of multiple formats from the agricultural history of North Carolina. One can start with any item like an annual report, then narrow that search for a particular agent, county, region, or extension program, and also search for a conference brochure for names, related reports, and images within our “Rare and Unique Special Collections” and “Historical State“.  Agent John Mitchell is one of a few cases were biographical essays are also available. By focusing on these resources, “Better Living” complements the previous NCSU Libraries LSTA-funded digitization projects, “Cultivating A Revolution” and “Green and Growing.” The three work together to expose scores of resources documenting the impact of agricultural innovation in NC across the last century.

If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and text materials documenting extension history and other topics.

Oct 20 2016

From the Archives: Presidents’ Visits to NC State and near campus

We are less than three weeks from Election Day, November 8th, and early voting will start this Thursday, October 20th. We hope you that those of you who can vote have made your plans, as we decide who will hold local offices, state offices, and this year, who will be our Commander in Chief.

A number of American presidents have visited NC State and near its campus, and the Special Collections Research Center’s Rare and Unique Digital Collections holds images from these events. Please enjoy these glimpses into the past!

President Harry S. Truman with Governor R. Gregg Cherry at NC State Fair, 1948.

President Theodore Roosevelt in Raleigh, 1910. He's wearing a top hat and is in the very center of the festoons.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Chancellor John William Harrelson at Farm and Home Week, 1947. Eisenhower was the Chief of Staff of the Army at the time.

Candidate John F. Kennedy addressing an estimated crowd of 8,000 at Reynolds Coliseum, 1960.

President Lyndon B. Johnson arriving for Democratic campaign rally held in Reynolds Coliseum, 1964

President Jimmy Carter at the 1991 Emerging Issues Forum.

President Ronald Reagan posing with Mr. and Mrs. Wuf, 1985.

President George Bush with Drs. Zhi-Yu Yang and Jan Schetzina in Physics Labs, 1990.

Bill Clinton, then governor of Arkansas, with North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt on a panel at the 1988 Emerging Issues Forum.

Candidate Barack Obama speaking at rally at Reynolds Coliseum

Candidate Barack Obama speaking at rally at Reynolds Coliseum, 2008.

Be sure to vote on Tuesday November 8, or take advantage of early voting October 20-November 5. You can find voting information at Wake County Board of Elections’ website, or for Durham County and Orange County.

You can find more archival materials related to American presidents here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Sep 29 2016

George Matsumoto Architectural Drawings Digitized

The Special Collections Research Center is pleased to announce that additional Matsumoto architectural drawings are now available online. The George Matsumoto Papers were acquired in the late 1990s and contain important materials documenting Matsumoto’s work, including correspondence, photographs, architectural drawings and sketches, and other materials. George Matsumoto’s work was documented in a publication from 1997 called “Simplicity, Order, and Discipline: The work of  George Matsumoto from the NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections.” In this book, a number of scholars weighed in on the importance of his work. Former College (then School) of Design architecture faculty member Robert Burns wrote, “George Matsumoto’s North Carolina legacy is distinctive, and, in many ways, heroic. He created a body of exceptional buildings….he also offered an example of integrity and dedication to principle that will long endure.”

Matsumoto was born in 1922 in San Francisco, California, and earned his B. A. in Architecture from Washington University. He studied at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and later worked with various architectural firms. Soon thereafter he joined NC State’s new School of Design in 1948 until he left for Berkeley in 1961. Matsumoto was brought to NC State by Henry L. Kamphoefner, the first Dean of the School of Design. Matsumoto is considered to be one of the key early faculty members at Design, and especially important as a practitioner and teacher who promoted modernist architecture. Matsumoto was influenced by leading architects such as Mies van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer; Burns wrote that “The ideas that mattered most to George Matsumoto as a designer and as a teacher were those that served as the focal themes of the modern movement: strict adherence to functional demands, clarity of plan, structural logic and expression, economy of means, perfection of detail, and the rationalization of construction processes tending toward industrialization.”

To learn more about Special Collections, or to access Special Collections materials, please contact us here.

Aug 02 2016

Hidden Documents Within The Cooperative Extension Service Annual Reports

Annual reports and plans of work created by the Cooperative (Agricultural) Extension service document their completed tasks and goals to improve the agriculture and economy of North Carolina and its citizens. While primarily composed of text, they often contained a combination of media and information visuals designed to supplement the written information. Those supplements included pamphlets, extension circulars, newspaper clippings, radio scripts, and even blueprints.

Below are several examples of unique items digitized within these reports by the “Better Living” project.

Extension Circular No. 272 - Disease Control in the Home Garden, February 1944. From Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina for 1944

Extension circulars were publications on various agricultural technical topics printed on a few pages for easy use. Many more of these were digitized in the Green and Growing project.

Magazine “Business of Farming” Autumn 1956. From North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report for 1956

There are numerous articles and press releases within these reports from North Carolina newspapers and regional agricultural magazines. These articles were usually contributed by an extension service department agent.  The article from the “Business of Farming” magazine  (above) includes an interview with W. C. Warrick, an extension agricultural engineer and a farm couple from Alexander County, North Carolina, on the development of the best type of home for a modern (1950s) farm family.

Brochure for 1966 N. C. Farm Materials Handling Exposition - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1966.

Several brochures and flyers are important records of the educational outreach of extension agents and professors.

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Oversized Bar Graph - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Narrative Report For 1943

Many reports from the Biological and Agricultural Engineering extension office contain oversized blueprints of modern farming facilities and data charts which had to be carefully unfolded so a resource could be digitized using our overhead scanner.

Architectural Drawing - North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service Annual Report - Agricultural Production, Management, and Natural Resources Use 1965

Technical drawings from within the annual reports reveal the intricate planning of agricultural research stations and facilities in North Carolina.

Photos - Report of Extension Work in Plant Pathology in North Carolina For 1944

Many photographs of extension activities were printed within the text of some annual reports. In some cases original photographs were affixed to report pages as documentation of extension activities.

Resources related to all agricultural sciences taught by the Cooperative Extension are available as part of the NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics. Additionally, Historic State is rich resource for discovering information about the university’s role in creating educational materials about agriculture in North Carolina.

Jul 15 2016

From the Archives: Summer Fun at 4-H Camps

We here at NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Research Center want to help you beat the heat with these images taken of kids at 4-H summer camps. Our Rare and Unique Digital Collections has a great amount of materials related to the history and activities of the NC Cooperative Extension, an organization which includes the Department of 4-H Youth Development. The images below were taken at North Carolina summer camps established through the Cooperative Extension, where 4-H children could find education and recreation during their vacation months.

You can find more images related to 4-H camps here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.