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Posts tagged: NC State History

Jul 17 2017

From Somewhere in France: Letters from Alumni in World War I

This illustration from the 1919 Agromeck commemorates the NC State men serving in the War (with blue stars) and those who perished in the War (gold stars)

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of U.S. participation in World War I, Special Collections News continues its examination of the impact that the war had on NC State students, faculty, and campus.  This post will look at letters sent from soldiers abroad published in NC State’s Alumni News.  Visit our previous post on NC State during World War I , as well as the posts by our colleagues at the NC State News blog, including one on alumnus Jimmy Higgs.

In 1918, the NC State (then “State College”) Alumni News began publishing updates on alumni and students engaged in the war effort abroad, including lists of who was in training and who was deployed.  A frequent section listed the State alumni stationed “Somewhere in France” – “somewhere” because exact locations were redacted for security reasons.  Frequently the Alumni News featured excerpts of letters sent home to family members, providing first hand accounts of life for these young men as they fought in a land with a different language and culture, that had already been at war for four years before the Americans arrived.  A sampling of these letters is below.

“The first thing that I noticed was the greenness of the landscape.  This struck me even before I landed.  Next are the peculiar chain-like docks or quays; then the buildings are all made of stone and modeled after some olden pattern (..) As to conditions in France they are not as bad as painted in American newspapers, except perhaps near the trenches where the enemy have overrun the French territory.  All through central and southern France hundreds of German prisoners work for their daily bread as though they were laboring men working for their daily hire. (..) When we get a chance at the ‘boches’ [Germans] the training we are getting should tell mightily.  Therefore since it is all for the cause, I can bear it, the drudgery, without grumbling.” – Alumni News Vol. 1, No. 4 February 1918

-Joshua Barnes Farmer, Jr. Class of 1919. Farmer was killed in action in France near Soissons on July 18, 1918.

“The American soldiers over here are in this world’s strife to win with this glad thought in mind; the Stars and Stripes have never known defeat and must not know it now.  We must and are going to win, if it takes the last man and the last dollar to do it.  If the American people could see the conditions, the expressions on the faces of these wonderful French people and know what they have suffered at the hands of the world’s enemy, they would not take our part in the war so hard.  Some of us will see it through and return to our loved ones, and some of us are to stay here and represent America’s part in the world’s war.  We are all contented and willing to sacrifice our all for this great cause.  When I get at the front I shall do my best and no one can do more and at present I would not return to the States if I could.  The part that the American women have undertaken is as important as the front line trenches and their sacrifices as sacred and as hard as those of their loved ones over here.” – Alumni News, Vol 1, No. 9, page 8.  July 1, 1918

-Edgar Exum Cobb, Class of 1919

“I’ve been through the tortures of hell in the last week.  I’ve been in a boche attack, and I’ve seen so much blood and dead men that I’m upset, but I came out of it all without a scratch, just by the grace of God.  I think He must have heard your prayers and answered them.  The boche bombarded our trenches for four hours and then used liquid fire.  I’m out for the first time for a while.  I haven’t washed for four days nor have I slept any, so I am all nerves just at present.

I think I must have held the family name up; I don’t know just what I did, but my captain has recommended me for a croix de guerre and I am to be decorated by the French officials in the next few days.  It’s all a mystery to me.  I’m rather mixed up on it yet, but hope to find out more later.” -Alumni News, Vol.1, No. 10, page 3.  August 1, 1918

-Pierre Mallet, Class of 1915.  Awarded the Croix de Guerre for bravery.

“But did I hear you say heavenly wine – whoo! – goodnight! – If I were to tell you how they made wine here, you would be sick for a month.  Over here the people do not know what water is, for all drink wine – red, white, and all grades of it.  It is essentially a nation of wine. Sometimes I just wonder how they live.  It is interesting to know how it is made.  You know we have community creameries in the States.  Over here they have ‘community wineries.’ (..)

Something of the life we live here, did you say?  Well, frankly, it is mostly work.  We are building, preparing for the incoming boys.  But when duty is over we have much time for pleasure.  And here let me say that too much praise cannot be given to the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. for the valuable aid given to us. (..) I see hundreds of boys having good movies, good music, good wholesome fun of all grades.  Hundreds of boys are entertained there who might otherwise be be in other things.  In short, the Y.M.C.A. and kindred organizations are placing themselves between the boys and temptation.” – Alumni News, Vol. 1, No. 7

-Reuben L. Tatum, Class of 1916

“There are three things the English, French, and Belgians have us beat on, and that is farming, good horses and good cattle; and we could have these if we bred live-stock and farmed like they do.  America is the coming country, because there are such great opportunities for improvement.” - Alumni News, Vol. 1, No. 12, October 1, 1918

-Drew Sugg Harper, Class of 1915.  Suggs was a member of the army veterinary corps.

“Things are exceedingly quiet tonight – few heavy guns and rats to break the silence.  Trench life is great – that is, if one doesn’t weaken.  Very seldom, though, you see a State College man weaken, if any.

It’s very cold here now, but my dugout is very comfortable; plenty to eat, smoke, and drink.  Trench life isn’t so bad after all.” – Alumni News, Vol. 2, No. 1, page 1.  November 1, 1918

-Roney M. High, Class of ‘14

“My dugout at present is only of thin boards and should a shell happen to land here I would not be able to finish my story.  To make a dugout shell-proof, you have to dig thirty feet.  From the way the Boche are treating us tonight I have made up my mind to dig a real dugout.  At present it is 11 o’clock and the shells have been popping around us for an hour, and seem to increase.  The little fellows – that is, the one pounders – can do a great deal of damage, but when the ‘Mimmy Whiffers’ (our pet name for them) get near, we hunt the deepest place we can find.  They strike the ground, bore about ten or fifteen feet, then blow up the whole hill.”

“The cooties are here all right and can bite like blazes.  The other pets are rats, and they are all kinds and sizes.  Most of them, though, are as large as our cats.  They will run over you, nibble your fingers, and make a regular playhouse out of your bunk.  Guess it is a good thing I stay up at nights and manage to get a few hours sleep in the daytime.” – Alumni News, Vol. 1, No. 11, September 1, 1918

-Frank M. Thompson, Class of 1910. Thompson was killed in battle September 13, just 12 days after this letter was published.

A tribute to Frank Thompson appears in the October 1, 1918 Alumni News. It includes the photo below with the caption “He who dies Somewhere-in-France lives Everywhere.”

Many Alumni News have recently been digitized and are available on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, as well as video, audio, and textual materials documenting the history of NC State and other topics.

May 17 2017

Celebrating the Class of 1967 and the Forever Club

Last week, members of the NC State University graduating class of 1967 joined the Alumni Association’s Forever Club, a community of alumni who graduated from NC State 50 years ago and earlier. Special Collections joined the celebration for a third year in a row, bringing a show and tell of items from the archives that reflected their time as students at NC State.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

The class of 1967 would have taken classes in the newly constructed Harrelson Hall, spent time in the Erdahl-Cloyd Student Union (currently housing the Atrium and West Wing of D.H. Hill Library), witnessed the Pullen Hall fire of 1965, welcomed growing numbers of female students living in the first female dorm on campus in Watauga Hall, celebrated the first football game in the new Carter-Finley Stadium, honored legendary basketball coach Everett Case and welcomed new coach Norman Sloan, and much more.

Alumni gathered at the Park Alumni Center to kick off their reunion weekend, and spent time exploring Agromeck yearbooks, issues of the 1964-1965 Technician from their freshman year, admissions booklets for prospective students noting the price of tuition in 1964 ($162.50 per semester for in-state students), athletics programs, brochures and calendars of events in the student union, photographs, computer punch cards from the first Computing Center on campus, and more.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni shared some of their memories of the events reflected in the materials on display, and several sat down to record these stories in Wolf Tales recordings that will add more nuance to the record of this period on campus. One alumnus described watching the news of the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, and being sent home early for Thanksgiving that year. Another alumnus spoke about the excitement and challenges of using a large, shared computer in the Computing Center to complete his course work as an Electrical Engineering student.

As part of our work to document and share the history of NC State, especially from the student perspective, we look forward to collecting stories and bringing materials from the archives into the hands of alumni and other members of the NC State community. You can explore more university history through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Apr 26 2017

Images from the Archives: A view of ever-changing Hillsborough Street

All of the construction on Hillsborough Street may be turning the area into an unfamiliar place. However, while Hillsborough Street has been consistent in its importance to North Carolina State University and its neighborhood, it has gone through much change since it was lain in 1792.

Here are some images from the Rare and Unique Digital Collections featuring historic Hillsborough Street, including our collection’s oldest image taken in 1884, three years before the land grant college that would become NC State was chartered.

Dining hall for the Exposition of 1884, on Hillsborough Street

This dining hall was set up for the North Carolina Exposition of 1884, which highlighted the state's progress in agriculture and industry.

The location has changed greatly in the last 133 years. For instance the street once had trolley tracks for traveling towards downtown Raleigh. When the trolley was discontinued, the tracks were paved over, only to be uncovered during construction in 2010.

Trolley traveling on Hillsborough Street near the State Capitol

Trolley traveling on Hillsborough Street towards the State Capitol, 1910s

Trolley Track unearthed during Hillsborough Street roundabout construction

Trolley track unearthed during Hillsborough Street roundabout construction, 2010

From 1873-1925, the North Carolina State Fair took place across the other side of Hillsborough Street from campus, and the fair grounds today are located alongside the street, though now several miles west.

Historic Marker on Hillsborough Street about N. C. State Fair

Historic Marker on Hillsborough Street about N. C. State Fair

Fairgrounds across from Patterson Hall on Hillsborough Street

Fairgrounds across from Patterson Hall on Hillsborough Street, 1910s

Hillsborough Street has also been where NC State has held Homecoming Parades.

4-H Club float for the 1956 Homecoming Parade

4-H Club float for the Homecoming Parade, November 1956

Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity members in Homecoming Parade

Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity members in Homecoming Parade, circa 1980

During the Vietnam Era, NC State students would take Hillsborough Street to march from campus to the State Capitol building.

North Carolina college students march on the Capitol

NC State, Duke, and Carolina students marching on Capitol to protest the Kent State massacre and the US military expansion into Cambodia, May 8, 1970

While Hillsborough Street has changed so much, you can still find some familiarity in these historical images.

Aerial View of Hillsborough Street

Aerial View of Hillsborough Street, 1940s

Corner of Hillsborough Street and Horne Street

Corner of Hillsborough Street and Horne Street, circa 1980

Front view of Tompkins Hall, North Carolina State College, showing automobiles parked on Hillsborough Street

Front view of Tompkins Hall, with automobiles parked on Hillsborough Street, circa 1955

    Horse drawn carriages on Hillsborough Street, looking east toward Tompkins Hall

Horse drawn carriages on Hillsborough Street, looking east toward Tompkins Hall, circa 1921

Line in front of Brother's Pizza Palace on Hillsborough Street

Line in front of Brother's Pizza Palace on Hillsborough Street, 1975

What a history of a single street! If you enjoyed these images and want to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting the history of NC State and other topics.

References:
“Hillsborough St. Timeline of History.” History | Hillsborough St Project. 2016. Accessed April 26, 2017. https://hillsboroughst.raleighnc.gov/content/history.
“Student Life Timeline.” Historical State Timelines. Accessed April 26, 2017. https://historicalstate.lib.ncsu.edu/timelines/student-life.
Hill, Michael. “North Carolina Exposition of 1884.” North Carolina Exposition of 1884 | NCpedia. 2006. Accessed April 26, 2017. http://www.ncpedia.org/north-carolina-exposition-1884.
Mims, Bryan. “When Streetcars Ruled the Roads of North Carolina.” Our State Magazine. October 5, 2015. Accessed April 26, 2017. https://www.ourstate.com/history-of-north-carolina-streetcars/.

Hill, Michael. “North Carolina Exposition of 1884.” North Carolina Exposition of 1884. NCpedia, 2006. Web. 26 Apr. 2017. <http://www.ncpedia.org/north-carolina-exposition-1884>.

Jan 23 2017

Wolf Tales Receives 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant

We’re happy to announce that the SCRC’s mobile oral history program, Wolf Tales, has received a 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant from the NCSU Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity (OIED). As described in this announcement from NCSU Libraries, the grant will support focused outreach to campus groups to document the voices of historically underrepresented students at NC State.

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

In its first year Wolf Tales has captured 41 recordings with a diverse range of voices, from current students to alumni of the class of 1943. The Wolf Tales video recordings and transcripts are archived and shared online through the Libraries’ Rare & Unique Digital Collections site. The Libraries has brought Wolf Tales recording stations to events ranging from annual reunions of the NCSU Alumni Association to “open days” in the Libraries where participants are invited to sit down individually or in groups of 2-3 people to make a 10-20 minute recording.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Having partnered with the African American Cultural Center to record student and alumni voices at Harambee! 2016, Wolf Tales will work with other campus organizations that support current and former students whose experiences have not been fully represented in written documentation, including in African American, LGBT, military veteran, Muslim, Latinx, and Native American communities.

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Plans are currently underway to bring Wolf Tales to the GLBT Center’s Lavender Graduation in April 2017 to gather stories of the experiences of GLBT students and their allies. Wolf Tales plans to extend this framework to other underrepresented voices through partnerships with other OIED units and student groups to create a more diverse, inclusive record and to prevent future silences in the archives.

If you’re interested in making a recording or discussing a possible partnership with Wolf Tales, please contact library_wolftales@ncsu.edu, and visit the Wolf Tales website for more information. We are actively seeking partners and would love to hear from you!

Jan 10 2017

Special Collections Display in Veterinary Medicine Library

Currently on display in the William Rand Kenan Jr. Library of Veterinary Medicine is a selection of items highlighting the history of the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine, a legacy preserved and shared by the Special Collections Research Center. The display features materials that tell the story of the evolution of the College of Veterinary Medicine, focusing especially on the administrators, faculty, and students at the heart of that story. Below is a preview of the items on display – visit the Veterinary Medicine Library to see more!

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

The two original barns were built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s. The site became the University Dairy Farm for NC State in 1940, before becoming part of the original campus of the School of Veterinary Medicine (later re-named the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1987).  Photographs located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420).

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

A biography of founding dean Terrence Curtin, in the 1984 “Fact Book” for School of Veterinary Medicine, is located in the NCSU Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity Records (UA 005.009).

Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

The NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association (SCAVMA) was founded in 1981, by the first class of students enrolled in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Image above is found in the Vet Med 1984 yearbook, “VetCetera,” located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Publications (UA 145.200).

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

The College of Veterinary Medicine installed a whale skeleton in its main building in 1988, after collecting the skeleton from the Outer Banks in 1986 through the work of faculty members J.W. Doyle, Ed Smallwood, and Paul Nader, as well as Vet Med student and faculty volunteers and the National Guard. The above photographs are located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420). More information on the skeleton discovery and installation can be found in the Technician article below.

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

These items and more will be on display in the Vet Med Library through the spring 2017 semester.

You can learn more about the history of the College of Veterinary Medicine through its Historical State timeline, and in other collection materials in the SCRC, including digitized photographs, documents, folders, and a written history by founding dean Terrence M. Curtin. If you have questions about the display or about these or other items in the SCRC, please contact us!

https://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f%5Bformat%5D%5B%5D=Text&q=veterinary+medicine

Jan 03 2017

Happy New Year from Special Collections

To help ring in the new year, we’re highlighting several issues of the Technician newspaper, featuring New Year’s wishes for NC State students from the student newspaper’s earliest years.

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The above issue from Jan. 4, 1924, included New Year greetings to students from Eugene Clyde Brooks, president of NC State from 1923-1934, encouraging the “young men” of State College (two years before the first women graduated with degrees from NC State) “who seek a new freedom on a higher moral and intellectual plane during the year 1924″ – and to avoid the “many opportunities” to indulge “low and base conduct.”

Below, a Jan. 1, 1922 issue celebrated a basketball victory over the holiday break and gave similar words of encouragement – especially urging the students to work “with and not against Student Government,” and help State College, as NC State was known at the time, continue to grow in positive ways.

he Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

The Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

You can browse these and many more issues online through our digitized Technician archive. Looking at first January issues of the year of the Technician over the years, the newspaper has reported on some common occurrences that are still relevant today as we prepare to start back into a new semester – basketball victories, the inaugurations of new governors, and students returning to campus and registering for classes, through rain, snow, and ice at times.

If you are interested in learning more about the digitized Technician online, or any other resources in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and collection guides, please feel free to contact us.  We hope that this new year brings the very best to all of our students, faculty and researchers!

Dec 07 2016

Remembering Pearl Harbor

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.  This event touched the lives of all Americans, including students here at NC State at the time.

In an oral history interview with William C. Friday, Friday describes his memories of first hearing about the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was a student at NC State (known at the time as State College), and its impact on his life. William Friday graduated from State College in 1941 with a degree in Textile Manufacturing, and went on to serve as President of the University of North Carolina system from 1956-1986.

Oral history with William C. Friday

Oral history with William C. Friday

Friday’s oral history can be heard as part of the Student Leadership Initiative, along with many other interviews with former student leaders over the years.

The Technician newspaper includes other evidence of the impact of Pearl Harbor on students at NC State.  According to the student newspaper on Feb. 7, 1942, NC State student Robert Westbrook was killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor.  Westbrook, a Raleigh native, was a radio operator in a bomber.

Clipping from Feb. 1942 Technician, acknowledging the death of student Robert Westbrook in Pearl Harbor.

Clipping from Feb. 1942 Technician, acknowledging the death of student Robert Westbrook in Pearl Harbor.

Almost one year after the attack, on Dec. 4, 1942, the Technician describes a “quiet observance” planned to take place at the Memorial Bell Tower, honoring “those alumni killed at Pearl Harbor or in other war action.” As part of the ceremony, ROTC units marched to the Bell Tower and played taps, one moment of silence was observed, and no speeches were made.

Clipping from Dec. 4, 1942, Technician describing Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony.

Clipping from Dec. 4, 1942, Technician describing Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony.

More student reactions to Pearl Harbor and other military events over the years can be found in digitized issues of the Technician, available through our Rare & Unique Digital Collections.  If you are interested in exploring or learning more about these or other collections in the Special Collections Research Center, please contact us.

Nov 28 2016

Communication Services Images Added to University Archives

Wear Red Get Fed Homecoming event in 2004

Thanks to a recent addition, researchers can now access photographic negatives and digital images of NC State history from 1985 to 2011.  The 44 linear feet of materials expands the scope of the North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Communication Services Records; in its totality, the collection now provides a photographic archive of NCSU history from the 1940s to the 2010s.

The Department of Communication Services (previously the Department of Visual Aids) provided communication leadership and innovation for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to further the mission of North Carolina State University. It maintained a collection of negatives in chronological order based on faculty and staff requests.  In 2002, reflecting a switch to digital, the images are stored on CD-ROM rather than as photographic negatives.   By 2013, Communication Services was no longer a department under the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It merged with Creative Services to become one of the three units under University Communications. The other units are News Services and Web Communications.

Some negatives that were previously acquired have already been digitized and made available on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site.  Their subjects include portraits of faculty, staff, and students, athletics, agriculture (including livestock, crops, and farm life), and Cooperative Extension activities (especially 4-H).  This latest accession contains images of campus building groundbreakings, campus events, award ceremonies, and faculty research.  Up until now, the University Archives has not had many images from this more recent time period (1980s-2010s) because it frequently takes time for records to make their way to us.  Therefore this valuable addition fills in an essential part of the visual narrative of the University.

While much of the collection has not yet been digitized, researchers are welcome to view any materials, including negatives and digital files.  Indexes do exist for locating images by topic or department.  Please contact the Special Collections Research Center for more information or to view the collection.

Chancellor Marye Anne Fox breaks ground on the David Clark Lab expansion, October 2003

College of Design student, hard at work in 2005

CALS Tailgate in Dorton Arena, 2003

Oct 20 2016

From the Archives: Presidents’ Visits to NC State and near campus

We are less than three weeks from Election Day, November 8th, and early voting will start this Thursday, October 20th. We hope you that those of you who can vote have made your plans, as we decide who will hold local offices, state offices, and this year, who will be our Commander in Chief.

A number of American presidents have visited NC State and near its campus, and the Special Collections Research Center’s Rare and Unique Digital Collections holds images from these events. Please enjoy these glimpses into the past!

President Harry S. Truman with Governor R. Gregg Cherry at NC State Fair, 1948.

President Theodore Roosevelt in Raleigh, 1910. He's wearing a top hat and is in the very center of the festoons.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Chancellor John William Harrelson at Farm and Home Week, 1947. Eisenhower was the Chief of Staff of the Army at the time.

Candidate John F. Kennedy addressing an estimated crowd of 8,000 at Reynolds Coliseum, 1960.

President Lyndon B. Johnson arriving for Democratic campaign rally held in Reynolds Coliseum, 1964

President Jimmy Carter at the 1991 Emerging Issues Forum.

President Ronald Reagan posing with Mr. and Mrs. Wuf, 1985.

President George Bush with Drs. Zhi-Yu Yang and Jan Schetzina in Physics Labs, 1990.

Bill Clinton, then governor of Arkansas, with North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt on a panel at the 1988 Emerging Issues Forum.

Candidate Barack Obama speaking at rally at Reynolds Coliseum

Candidate Barack Obama speaking at rally at Reynolds Coliseum, 2008.

Be sure to vote on Tuesday November 8, or take advantage of early voting October 20-November 5. You can find voting information at Wake County Board of Elections’ website, or for Durham County and Orange County.

You can find more archival materials related to American presidents here. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit the Rare and Unique Digital Collections for access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Oct 17 2016

New GLBT Timeline

Special Collections has recently created a new timeline showing the history of NC State’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender community. The timeline shows important events and milestones since the 1970s.

The timeline reveals the various student groups that have existed throughout this time period to support and promote the GLBT community.  In the 1980s there was the NC State Gay Community, and in 1990s the Lesbian and Gay Student Union.  In the late 1990s Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian and Allies (BGLA) became active, and since 2007 there has been an NC State chapter of AEGIS (Accepting and Embracing Gender Identity and Sexuality). These groups have brought attention to and support for the GLBT community through such activities as Blue Jeans Days, Gay Awareness Days, and various rallies, as well as such programs as Project Safe.

The timeline shows the evolution of GLBT inclusion in the university’s non-discrimination policy.  In 1991 official university statements only went so far as to state that sexual orientation would not be relevant to educational and employment decisions.  By 1998, sexual orientation was considered a factor in making a diverse student body.  In 2003 the university included sexual orientation in its Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policy Statement, and in 2012 it added gender identity and gender expression.

Such milestones as the GLBT Center’s creation in 2008 and the first Lavender Graduation in 2009 are included in the timeline, as is recent campus reaction to HB2.

The GLBT timeline has been created as NC State celebrates Diversity Education Week this week.  You may also be interested in looking at the timelines showing the history of African Americans and women on our campus.  Additional timelines and other resources on university history exist on our Historical State website.