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Posts tagged: students

May 17 2017

Celebrating the Class of 1967 and the Forever Club

Last week, members of the NC State University graduating class of 1967 joined the Alumni Association’s Forever Club, a community of alumni who graduated from NC State 50 years ago and earlier. Special Collections joined the celebration for a third year in a row, bringing a show and tell of items from the archives that reflected their time as students at NC State.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

Archival materials on display for the Class of 1967 and Forever Club.

The class of 1967 would have taken classes in the newly constructed Harrelson Hall, spent time in the Erdahl-Cloyd Student Union (currently housing the Atrium and West Wing of D.H. Hill Library), witnessed the Pullen Hall fire of 1965, welcomed growing numbers of female students living in the first female dorm on campus in Watauga Hall, celebrated the first football game in the new Carter-Finley Stadium, honored legendary basketball coach Everett Case and welcomed new coach Norman Sloan, and much more.

Alumni gathered at the Park Alumni Center to kick off their reunion weekend, and spent time exploring Agromeck yearbooks, issues of the 1964-1965 Technician from their freshman year, admissions booklets for prospective students noting the price of tuition in 1964 ($162.50 per semester for in-state students), athletics programs, brochures and calendars of events in the student union, photographs, computer punch cards from the first Computing Center on campus, and more.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni browse materials on display.

Alumni shared some of their memories of the events reflected in the materials on display, and several sat down to record these stories in Wolf Tales recordings that will add more nuance to the record of this period on campus. One alumnus described watching the news of the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, and being sent home early for Thanksgiving that year. Another alumnus spoke about the excitement and challenges of using a large, shared computer in the Computing Center to complete his course work as an Electrical Engineering student.

As part of our work to document and share the history of NC State, especially from the student perspective, we look forward to collecting stories and bringing materials from the archives into the hands of alumni and other members of the NC State community. You can explore more university history through our Rare and Unique Digital Collections site, where you can also access thousands of imagesvideoaudio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.  If you’d like to learn more about these resources or have any other questions, as always, please feel free to contact us!

Jan 23 2017

Wolf Tales Receives 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant

We’re happy to announce that the SCRC’s mobile oral history program, Wolf Tales, has received a 2016-2017 Diversity Mini-Grant from the NCSU Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity (OIED). As described in this announcement from NCSU Libraries, the grant will support focused outreach to campus groups to document the voices of historically underrepresented students at NC State.

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

Shima Idries and Shamms DiarBakerli, Wolf Tales recording, 5 May 2016

In its first year Wolf Tales has captured 41 recordings with a diverse range of voices, from current students to alumni of the class of 1943. The Wolf Tales video recordings and transcripts are archived and shared online through the Libraries’ Rare & Unique Digital Collections site. The Libraries has brought Wolf Tales recording stations to events ranging from annual reunions of the NCSU Alumni Association to “open days” in the Libraries where participants are invited to sit down individually or in groups of 2-3 people to make a 10-20 minute recording.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Student and alumni participants in the first year of Wolf Tales recordings.

Having partnered with the African American Cultural Center to record student and alumni voices at Harambee! 2016, Wolf Tales will work with other campus organizations that support current and former students whose experiences have not been fully represented in written documentation, including in African American, LGBT, military veteran, Muslim, Latinx, and Native American communities.

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Elwood and Diane Hill Becton, at the African American Cultural Center's Harambee 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Cynthia M. Sharpe, Destinie Statum, and Jakini Kauba at Harambee! 2016, 8 September 2016

Plans are currently underway to bring Wolf Tales to the GLBT Center’s Lavender Graduation in April 2017 to gather stories of the experiences of GLBT students and their allies. Wolf Tales plans to extend this framework to other underrepresented voices through partnerships with other OIED units and student groups to create a more diverse, inclusive record and to prevent future silences in the archives.

If you’re interested in making a recording or discussing a possible partnership with Wolf Tales, please contact library_wolftales@ncsu.edu, and visit the Wolf Tales website for more information. We are actively seeking partners and would love to hear from you!

Jan 10 2017

Special Collections Display in Veterinary Medicine Library

Currently on display in the William Rand Kenan Jr. Library of Veterinary Medicine is a selection of items highlighting the history of the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine, a legacy preserved and shared by the Special Collections Research Center. The display features materials that tell the story of the evolution of the College of Veterinary Medicine, focusing especially on the administrators, faculty, and students at the heart of that story. Below is a preview of the items on display – visit the Veterinary Medicine Library to see more!

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

The two original barns were built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s. The site became the University Dairy Farm for NC State in 1940, before becoming part of the original campus of the School of Veterinary Medicine (later re-named the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1987).  Photographs located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420).

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

A biography of founding dean Terrence Curtin, in the 1984 “Fact Book” for School of Veterinary Medicine, is located in the NCSU Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity Records (UA 005.009).

Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

The NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association (SCAVMA) was founded in 1981, by the first class of students enrolled in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Image above is found in the Vet Med 1984 yearbook, “VetCetera,” located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Publications (UA 145.200).

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

The College of Veterinary Medicine installed a whale skeleton in its main building in 1988, after collecting the skeleton from the Outer Banks in 1986 through the work of faculty members J.W. Doyle, Ed Smallwood, and Paul Nader, as well as Vet Med student and faculty volunteers and the National Guard. The above photographs are located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420). More information on the skeleton discovery and installation can be found in the Technician article below.

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

These items and more will be on display in the Vet Med Library through the spring 2017 semester.

You can learn more about the history of the College of Veterinary Medicine through its Historical State timeline, and in other collection materials in the SCRC, including digitized photographs, documents, folders, and a written history by founding dean Terrence M. Curtin. If you have questions about the display or about these or other items in the SCRC, please contact us!

https://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f%5Bformat%5D%5B%5D=Text&q=veterinary+medicine

Jan 03 2017

Happy New Year from Special Collections

To help ring in the new year, we’re highlighting several issues of the Technician newspaper, featuring New Year’s wishes for NC State students from the student newspaper’s earliest years.

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The above issue from Jan. 4, 1924, included New Year greetings to students from Eugene Clyde Brooks, president of NC State from 1923-1934, encouraging the “young men” of State College (two years before the first women graduated with degrees from NC State) “who seek a new freedom on a higher moral and intellectual plane during the year 1924″ – and to avoid the “many opportunities” to indulge “low and base conduct.”

Below, a Jan. 1, 1922 issue celebrated a basketball victory over the holiday break and gave similar words of encouragement – especially urging the students to work “with and not against Student Government,” and help State College, as NC State was known at the time, continue to grow in positive ways.

he Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

The Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

You can browse these and many more issues online through our digitized Technician archive. Looking at first January issues of the year of the Technician over the years, the newspaper has reported on some common occurrences that are still relevant today as we prepare to start back into a new semester – basketball victories, the inaugurations of new governors, and students returning to campus and registering for classes, through rain, snow, and ice at times.

If you are interested in learning more about the digitized Technician online, or any other resources in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and collection guides, please feel free to contact us.  We hope that this new year brings the very best to all of our students, faculty and researchers!

Sep 19 2016

Past Shack-A-Thons on the Brickyard!

This week, you might come across some colorful, make-shift houses set up on the Brickyard. This is part of the annual Shack-A-Thon, where student groups are camping out to raise funds and awareness for Habitat for Humanity. As a charitable organization, Habitat for Humanity contributes to building homes for low income families, both in collecting money for the new houses and organizing events for volunteers to help build them.

This year, from September 19 to 23, students will stay on the Brickyard in plywood shacks they’ve constructed themselves, night and day, rain or shine, all towards fundraising for the NC State University Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. A visit there will show you eccentric and creative houses, some with raffles, bake sales, games, and events. Even if you cannot make the trip, please donate towards this great cause here.

We wish everyone the best of luck, so please enjoy these images of past Shack-A-Thons from the Special Collections Research Center’s Edward T. Funkhouser Photographs Collection, and you can see for yourselves why it has become such a memorable tradition.

Again, please donate to this year’s Shack-A-Thon. If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and text materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Aug 30 2016

Wolf Tales Captures Alumni Memories of Harrelson Hall

To wrap up our series of posts about Harrelson Hall, we’re sharing several short recordings captured with alumni as part of the SCRC’s Wolf Tales program, our mobile oral history program to integrate more student voices to the archives.  We set up recording stations at events around campus to record the stories of alumni and students about life at NC State, and then add these recordings to the archives and share them online, so that future generations of researchers can learn about the history of NC State from the voices of those who lived it.

In the fall of 2015, the Wake County Alumni Network hosted a “Last Look at Harrelson” event to invite alumni into the building for one last farewell before demolition began.  We sat down with three alums who shared their different memories and experiences of Harrelson as students, ranging from the 1970s to the 2000s.  Their different stories show the range of feelings about the building, both positive and negative.

Click on any of the images below to view the full videos.

Danny Peele, Class of 1974

Danny Peele, Class of 1974

Danny Peele (‘74) shared memories of showing off Harrelson Hall to visitors from his small town, taking classes in Harrelson, and acoustical problems and echoes in the classrooms.

Matthew Williams, Class of 2014

Matthew Williams, Class of 2014

Matt Williams (‘14) spoke about his childhood memories of seeing Harrelson Hall while visiting NC State’s campus with his mother, an NC State alum, and later as a student at NC State, and the friendships he made in Harrelson through his involvement with student government.

Laurie Mitchell, Class of 2004

Laurie Mitchell, Class of 2004

Laurie Mitchell (‘04) talked about taking classes in Harrelson Hall, the challenges and functional issues of the building (including windowless rooms and inconveniently located women’s restrooms), positive memories of professors who taught classes in Harrelson, and appreciating the mid century modern design of Harrelson and its place as an iconic building on campus.

You can learn more about the Wolf Tales program and view upcoming recording sessions at our website, and view more recordings of alumni and current students sharing their stories of life at NC State here.  If you have questions or would like to learn more about Wolf Tales, write to library_wolftales@ncsu.edu, and if you have questions about using any of our collections always feel free to contact us!

Apr 25 2016

Identifying the Stories in Our Collections

As part of several recent outreach events, the Special Collections Research Center has produced giveaway buttons featuring images from our digitized collections. The button images generate awareness of and interest in our collections, and often spark questions about the stories behind the people featured in them.

Button designs featuring women scientists and engineers at NC State.

Button designs featuring women scientists and engineers at NC State.

In particular, a set of buttons we created for the Science Scircus, a recent event on the Brickyard organized by the College of Sciences Director of Public Science Holly Menninger, featured historic images of women scientists and engineers at NC State.  Students and faculty picking up the buttons were excited to learn about the women highlighted on the buttons, and while we know the names and stories of many of these women, such as Emily Brown Blount, the first female student to graduate with a degree in Civil Engineering, and Frances “Billie” Richardson, the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering, others remain a mystery.

We can gather that this woman was working in the College of Textiles in the 1950s.

We can gather that this woman was working in the College of Textiles in the 1950s.

This photograph was likely used in recruiting materials in the 1970s. If there any ideas about the equipment or the possible discipline she would be working in, we'd love to know them!

This photograph was likely used in recruiting materials in the 1970s. If there any ideas about the equipment or the possible discipline she would be working in, we'd love to know them!

As a sampling of the broader collection, the buttons highlight a broader challenge: the images that we place online in our digitized collections often arrive in the archives without detailed identifying information for us to provide users in the form of metadata. However, as we continue to develop relationships with members of the NC State community through our growing outreach program, we create more opportunities to meet users who can provide this information and help us better describe the materials.

As we connect more users with material in our collections, we invite them to share any information they may have that can help us describe them in greater detail.  If you recognize any of the unidentified people, events, or places in our collections, please let us know!

Mar 14 2016

Enhancing Research on Women in STEM

In honor of Women’s History Month, two NCSU Libraries Fellows, Heidi Tebbe and Virginia Ferris, organized an event at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library, co-sponsored by Kathy Titus-Becker and the WISE Village, using the iPearl Immersion Theater to demonstrate how resources at the NCSU Libraries can assist researchers and others wanting to learn more about the legacy of women in STEM at NC State, from its earliest pioneers to today.

SCRC materials highlighted in a visualization in the iPearl Immersion Theatre at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library.

SCRC materials highlighted in a visualization in the iPearl Immersion Theater at the James B. Hunt Jr. Library.

Dr. Christine Grant, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of Faculty Development and Special Initiatives in the College of Engineering at NC State, gave introductory remarks on the importance of advocacy and mentoring to increase diversity in the STEM fields. Dr. Grant became the first African American woman to join the faculty of the College of Engineering at NC State when she arrived in the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1989. In addition to being a leader in her field she is widely recognized for broadening the participation, promotion, and retention of underrepresented minorities in STEM. Dr. Grant is co-editor of the book Success Strategies From Women in STEM.

Dr. Christine Grant gives opening remarks.

Dr. Christine Grant gives opening remarks.

Following remarks in the Duke Energy Hall, Tebbe and Ferris debuted a visualization in the iPearl Immersion Theater, highlighting a selection of materials from key collections on women in STEM in the Special Collections Research Center, as well as more recent institutional data. The visualization featured materials from collections of pioneering women in the STEM fields at NC State, including Mary Yarbrough, Katharine Stinson, Gertrude Cox, Frances M. Richardson, and the NCSU Chapter of the Society of Women Engineers.

Included in these selections were photographs, documents, and oral history clips that offer insight into the experiences and perspectives of these early women leaders in STEM at NC State. A letter from Gertrude Cox offered words of encouragement to a young woman interested in entering the field of statistics in 1959:

The field of statistics is certainly wide open to women. If you are willing to take the mathematics and science courses and then work very hard to get beyond the junior level, there are all sorts of opportunities to go as far as you wish.

- Gertrude Cox, 1959

Katharine Stinson’s collection contains several oral history recordings that allow us to actually see and hear her tell her story, in her own voice.  She tells the story of meeting Amelia Earhart when she was a teenager working at an airport in Raleigh. When Stinson told Earhart that she wanted to become a pilot, Earhart told her to become an engineer instead, so she could be in charge of the planes that pilots flew. With this, Stinson made the decision that she would go to NC State to become an engineer.

Oral history with Katharine Stinson, conducted by Gene Nora Jessen, 1990.

Oral history with Katharine Stinson, conducted by Gene Nora Jessen, 1990.

The interview includes this story and the story of what happened when Stinson arrived at NC State to enroll in the College of Engineering:

After I graduated from high school, I found out that at North Carolina State University they taught Mechanical Engineering with an Aeronautical Option. So I went up to enroll in Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Option. When I got there – I guess I was sort of stupid – I didn’t notice that there weren’t any other girls around, but anyway.

When I got up to the place to enroll, this man looked up at me and said, ‘What are you doing here, little girl?’ And I said, ‘I’ve come here to enroll in engineering.’ He said, ‘Girls don’t go to school here. Girls don’t study engineering.’ I said, ‘Oh, I want to be an aeronautical engineer.’ And he said, ‘We don’t take girls here.’

- Katharine Stinson, oral history with Gene Nora Jessen, 1990

The man that Stinson refers to in this excerpt was the dean of the College of Engineering at the time, Wallace C. Riddick. Stinson went to Meredith College and in just one year she earned two years’ worth of academic credit. She returned to apply to NC State and was admitted in 1937 as the first woman student in Engineering. She graduated in 1941 and went on to become a founder of the Society of Women Engineers, the first woman woman engineer hired by the Civil Aeronautics Administration (now the FAA), and a lifelong advocate for women entering STEM fields.

The complete video oral history with Katharine Stinson, conducted by her colleague Gene Nora Jessen in 1990, is available online in our digitized collections.

While these materials and collections provide an important foundation for documenting this important history, it is an area where the SCRC continues to grow and build. Using the high technology spaces at the Hunt Library for this event allowed us to engage the NC State community to create greater awareness of what we have in our collections, and of our efforts to continue to build collections on women in STEM at NC State. We look forward to continuing to build partnerships with students, faculty, alumni, and other members of the community in our efforts to capture an increasingly inclusive and diverse record of the university.

Kathy Titus-Becker and students from the WISE Village discuss the visualization in the iPearl Immersion Theatre.

Kathy Titus-Becker and students from the WISE Village discuss the visualization in the iPearl Immersion Theatre.

Visit go.ncsu.edu/researchwomeninstem for information and resources related to research on women in STEM at NC State University, and contact us if you have questions or ideas about using or building upon these collections.

Mar 02 2016

Image Discovery Week: Campaigns, Elections, and Voting!

In honor of Image Discovery Week at Design, we would like to take a moment to highlight some of our image resources from our Rare and Unique Materials. The University Archives Photograph Collection contains a wealth of information about university history and student life,  including images of the Student Government elections. Check out these images of students campaigning and voting in elections past.

Ron Jessup campaigning for Student Body President, 1974

Students voting, 1977

Campaign sign for Rusty Mau and Devon Riley, 2014

Eric Plow campaigning for Student Body President, 1970-1971

Students voting, 1982

Feb 17 2016

State’s Mates Alumni Reception

This past weekend, Special Collections Research Center staff brought a special pop-up exhibit and new Wolf Tales oral history booth to the NCSU Alumni Association’s State’s Mates Reception, as part of a celebration of alumni couples who met at NC State. Among the items on display were Agromeck yearbooks from the 1960s through the 2000s, programs and yearbooks from the original State’s Mates organization, and photographs of NC State’s favorite couple, Mr. and Mrs. Wuf. The famous couple stopped by the exhibit and enjoyed seeing a photo from their wedding ceremony, officiated by Demon Deacon at an NCSU vs. Wake Forest basketball game in 1981.

Mr. and Mrs. Wuf show off their wedding photo.

Mr. and Mrs. Wuf show off their wedding photo.

Our staff tested out the new recording booth as part of our mobile oral history program, Wolf Tales: Capturing University Voices, by recording short interviews with some of the couples attending the event. Alumni sat down to record the stories of how they met, and other favorite memories of their time as students, in video interviews that will be made available in our digital collections. One couple recalled their memory of being at the basketball game where Mr. and Mrs. Wuf were first married (in addition to their subsequent Wuf vow renewals at later games). Another alum told the story of asking his wife out on their first date while she was studying in D.H. Hill Library.

Alumni couple Sharon DuRant Evans ('85) and Antonio Evans ('84) record their story in the Wolf Tales booth.

Alumni couple Sharon DuRant Evans ('85) and Antonio Evans ('84) record their story in the Wolf Tales booth.

We had a great time meeting the couples who came out for the reception, and look forward to more events to come! To learn more about Wolf Tales and find out about future events, check out the Wolf Tales website or contact library_wolftales@ncsu.edu.