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Posts tagged: Technician

Jan 10 2017

Special Collections Display in Veterinary Medicine Library

Currently on display in the William Rand Kenan Jr. Library of Veterinary Medicine is a selection of items highlighting the history of the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine, a legacy preserved and shared by the Special Collections Research Center. The display features materials that tell the story of the evolution of the College of Veterinary Medicine, focusing especially on the administrators, faculty, and students at the heart of that story. Below is a preview of the items on display – visit the Veterinary Medicine Library to see more!

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

Veterinary Medicine campus site, circa 1977.

The two original barns were built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in the 1930s. The site became the University Dairy Farm for NC State in 1940, before becoming part of the original campus of the School of Veterinary Medicine (later re-named the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1987).  Photographs located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420).

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

Terrence Curtin, founding dean of the NCSU School of Veterinary Medicine, serving from 1979-1992.

A biography of founding dean Terrence Curtin, in the 1984 “Fact Book” for School of Veterinary Medicine, is located in the NCSU Office of Equal Opportunity and Equity Records (UA 005.009).

Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association, featured in 1984 Vet Med yearbook, "VetCetera."

The NCSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medicine Association (SCAVMA) was founded in 1981, by the first class of students enrolled in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Image above is found in the Vet Med 1984 yearbook, “VetCetera,” located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Publications (UA 145.200).

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

Installing whale skeleton in College of Veterinary Medicine building, 1988.

The College of Veterinary Medicine installed a whale skeleton in its main building in 1988, after collecting the skeleton from the Outer Banks in 1986 through the work of faculty members J.W. Doyle, Ed Smallwood, and Paul Nader, as well as Vet Med student and faculty volunteers and the National Guard. The above photographs are located in the Terrence M. Curtin Papers (MC 00420). More information on the skeleton discovery and installation can be found in the Technician article below.

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

Technician article, Oct. 1, 1986: “Skeleton gave Vet School ‘whale’ of a job”

These items and more will be on display in the Vet Med Library through the spring 2017 semester.

You can learn more about the history of the College of Veterinary Medicine through its Historical State timeline, and in other collection materials in the SCRC, including digitized photographs, documents, folders, and a written history by founding dean Terrence M. Curtin. If you have questions about the display or about these or other items in the SCRC, please contact us!

https://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f%5Bformat%5D%5B%5D=Text&q=veterinary+medicine

Jan 03 2017

Happy New Year from Special Collections

To help ring in the new year, we’re highlighting several issues of the Technician newspaper, featuring New Year’s wishes for NC State students from the student newspaper’s earliest years.

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The Technician, Jan. 4, 1924

The above issue from Jan. 4, 1924, included New Year greetings to students from Eugene Clyde Brooks, president of NC State from 1923-1934, encouraging the “young men” of State College (two years before the first women graduated with degrees from NC State) “who seek a new freedom on a higher moral and intellectual plane during the year 1924″ – and to avoid the “many opportunities” to indulge “low and base conduct.”

Below, a Jan. 1, 1922 issue celebrated a basketball victory over the holiday break and gave similar words of encouragement – especially urging the students to work “with and not against Student Government,” and help State College, as NC State was known at the time, continue to grow in positive ways.

he Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

The Technician, Jan. 1, 1922

You can browse these and many more issues online through our digitized Technician archive. Looking at first January issues of the year of the Technician over the years, the newspaper has reported on some common occurrences that are still relevant today as we prepare to start back into a new semester – basketball victories, the inaugurations of new governors, and students returning to campus and registering for classes, through rain, snow, and ice at times.

If you are interested in learning more about the digitized Technician online, or any other resources in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections and collection guides, please feel free to contact us.  We hope that this new year brings the very best to all of our students, faculty and researchers!

Sep 06 2016

Adding the Technician to our Web Archives

The Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries has archived and digitized the first 70 years of the print edition of the university’s student newspaper, the Technician. These scans, found on our Rare and Unique Digital Collections, are an important source of information, when it comes to documenting the history of the university. We now are expanding on this collection by adding the Technician website to our NC State University Websites web archive. We have started harvesting the website’s content daily, attempting to capture and preserve all of the stories that appear in the online version of the student newspaper.

The Technician has recently reduced the number of days a week it produces a printed version. With more content appearing only in the online version, it becomes especially important to archive the website, to ensure that all of this content is preserved in its original and complete online form.

While we only recently added the Technician website to our collection, the Internet Archive crawled and archived site content as early as February 04, 1998. As you can see from the image below, the capture was not complete; all of the images are missing! It does show that the Technician has had an online version dating back to at least 1998, which is impressive considering that was only two years after the New York Times first established their web presence.

Comparing the web archive capture to the scan of the printed version from that date allows us to see what stories appeared in both places. With the limited amount of content available in the online version from 1998 it is pretty easy to see that most of the stories appear in both places. Following each story link from the Internet Archive capture of the website allows you to explore each of the stories that were captured.

For comparison, here is the archived version of the Technician website from August 29th of this year. As you can see from the screenshot below, now that we can direct the crawl and preserve the website ourselves we have a much more complete capture. This allows us to see every article and image, as it appeared on the site on that day, to more accurately record the history of NC State as it appears in our student media.

Jul 01 2016

From the Archives: Let’s Have a Sane and Glorious Fourth!!

The Special Collections Research Center would like to wish everyone a wonderful Independence Day, or as The Technician phrased it in July 2, 1923, “Let’s Have a Sane and Glorious Fourth!!”

To help with your weekend’s sanity and gloriousness, here are other issues of the Technician newspaper with July Fourth articles:

To view more issues of  NC State’s Technician student newspaper, please visit our digitized collection of the first 70 years of the publication. If you want to see more images from the Special Collections Research Center, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Enjoy your Independence Day and have safe travels and festivities!

Jan 19 2016

In recognition of Martin Luther King, Jr.

As the NC State community returns to campus after the Martin Luther King, Jr., Day holiday, let us take time to remember the legacy of the influential civil rights leader and beloved icon.

NCSU Libraries’ Special Collections and Research Center has archived issues of The Technician available online, which includes an article “Dr. King Urges Passive Resistance for Negroes,” from the February 13, 1958 edition of the newspaper. The article summarizes Martin Luther King, Jr.’s visit to Raleigh, where he spoke on the subject of “Non-Violence and Racial Justice,”  a key component of his philosophy. The digitized Technician collection also features a January 20, 1986 article on NC State’s first celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, as well as many discoverable items on NC State’s relationship to Dr. King’s life, teachings, and legacy.

The Libraries and African American Culture Center’s Red, White, & Black multimedia project is another resource to explore while honoring Dr. King, and also in anticipation of next month’s Black History Month. It is a mobile-based tour of African-American history at NC State, made with location-aware software to provide a walking tour through our campus, providing text, audio, and images. The Special Collections and Research Center hosts the copies of the recordings in our Rare and Unique Digital Collections, and they can be found and listened to here.

In addition, please visit these past SCRC posts on Dr. King:
1958 Martin Luther King Visit
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Assassination and NCSU’s Reaction

If you would like to learn more about the Special Collections Research Center and our digitized materials, please visit NCSU Libraries’ Rare and Unique Digital Collections, which provides access to thousands of images, video, audio recordings, and textual materials documenting NC State history and other topics.

Jun 29 2015

1965 Rolling Stones Visit to Raleigh

When the Rolling Stones perform Wednesday night in Raleigh, circumstances will differ from their first appearance at NC State 50 years ago on November 10, 1965. That concert was during their second American tour; Wednesday night’s will be during their 20th. In 1965 they performed before 14,000 fans at Reynolds Coliseum; on Wednesday it will be 50,000+ at Carter-Finley Stadium.

The reviews may be different as well. A reporter with the Technician (NC State’s student paper) in 1965 was not impressed with their appearance, as can be seen in the article below published in the November 16th edition.

1965 Technician review of Rolling Stones

According to the reporter, the Stones attracted mostly a high school crowd, followed other performers that included Patti Labelle and the Bluebells, and played for only 15 minutes.  He reported that although they performed such hits as “Get Off of My Cloud” and “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction” they ultimately disappointed the fans. He predicted that “unlike the habits of the new-rich, the Stones are investing their money so that ‘they can retire and never work another day when their popularity begins to wane.’” As the Stones take over Carter-Finley Wednesday night, they prove that neither has happened yet.

For more Technician articles and images illustrating events from NC State’s past, browse our digitized collections.

In 2015 the Stones play Carter-Finley Stadium

In 1965 the Stones played Reynolds Coliseum

Jan 20 2015

1958 Martin Luther King Visit

The 13 Feb. 1958 Technician reported on a visit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to Raleigh on Feb. 10 of that year.  This may be the earliest date in which NC State’s student newspaper published an in-depth article about Dr. King, who was speaking at a local church’s Institute of Religion event.  Before an audience of 1700 people in Broughton High School, King discussed non-violent resistance to segregation.  The most significant part of the speech for the Technician reporter was King’s statement that “integration will never be a reality until such a time comes that all men understand and trust each other.”  Viewers can now read the full article online.

This online Technician archives has recently been made available by the NCSU Libraries as part of our mandate to preserve the history of North Carolina State University and distribute that history widely to scholars, alumni, and the public.  The Technician, the university’s student newspaper, is now available online in a format that is easy to browse and search.     Approximately4000 issues from 1920 through 1990 that are digitized and indexed in the NCSU Libraries’ online collection.  More recent issues will be added in the upcoming year.  More information can be found at the NCSU Libraries News.